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DWELL: "Piedmont Retreat, Durham, NC"

DWELL: “Piedmont Retreat, Durham, NC”

Tonic Design

Corten® steel provides a modest, low-maintenance exterior (it will never need painting) that will eventually weather to blend into the natural setting. Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

Wrapped in vertical stripes of Corten® steel street-side, with vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows overlooking the forest behind it, a modern house in the corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham dubbed “Piedmont Retreat” was honored recently with a Merit Award during the 2017 AIA North Carolina Residential Design Awards program.
Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design in Raleigh are responsible for this creative two-story, single-family structure that will, as the steel continues to weather, blend into the natural setting and never need painting. Their clients loved the concept since they wanted a low-maintenance house with a modest public presence. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:32:57+00:00October 31st, 2017|0 Comments

Builder Magazine

Builder Magazine features tonic’s design of the contemporary kitchen in the Hawthorne Residence:

builder

NORTH CAROLINA KITCHEN FACILITATES FAMILY INTERACTION

Sophisticated design touches balance a kid-friendly layout in this contemporary Raleigh home.

By Jennifer Goodman

This contemporary kitchen makes entertaining friends and family or even just cooking for the kids fun and easy. It was designed to allow the homeowners to prepare meals or socialize while keeping an eye on their children. The youngsters can play in the backyard just beyond the large sliding glass doors while mom and dad get dinner ready, hang out with friends, or do the dishes—all the while within sight of each other. 

Read the article on Builder.com.

2018-11-05T15:59:34+00:00January 6th, 2016|0 Comments

Tonic Design Awarded the George Matsumoto Prize for Fourth Time

Tonic Design Awarded the George Matsumoto Prize for Fourth Time

matsumto prize 2015July 23, 2015 (Raleigh, NC) – For the fourth year in a row, tonic design | tonic construction has taken top honors in the George Matsumoto Prize for Modernist residential design throughout North Carolina. The prize was sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across the state from the  mid-century to today.

Partners Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, received second place in the “Jury Awards” category for the Crabill Modern residence they designed and built in Hillsborough, NC. The home is a reinterpretation of a two-story house, with spatial overlaps and plenty of open space and a minimal footprint.
This was Tonic’s fourth consecutive prize in the competition. Last year, the firm’s Smart-Stell Residence in Durham, NC received First Place in the Jury Awards category. In 2013, Tonic’s Rank Residence in Pittsboro, NC won First Place in the Jury Awards category. Also, the Walters Residence received Third Place in NCMH’s awards program.

About The George Matsumoto Prize
The George Matsumoto Prize for North Carolina Modernist residential architecture is a unique design competition featuring $6,000 in awards, a blue-ribbon jury of internationally known architects and designers, and online public voting.  NCMH created the Matsumoto Prize in 2012 honor of George Matsumoto FAIA, one of the founding faculty members of North Carolina State University’s School of Design who designed some of North Carolina’s most well-known and well-loved Modernist houses.  
The Matsumoto Prize is the only juried architecture competition in North Carolina that focuses exclusively on Modernist houses, provides financial awards, involves a national jury plus public voting, and connects to a major architectural archive.  The Prize meaningfully and powerfully engages the public with the architecture they love and showcases exceptional Modernist architects and designers in North Carolina.  The 2015 Prize was underwritten by Leland Little Auctions.

2018-11-05T15:57:34+00:00July 23rd, 2015|0 Comments

DURHAM HERALD: "Rosenberg-Reeves Home Designed For How People Actually Live"

DURHAM HERALD: “Rosenberg-Reeves Home Designed For How People Actually Live”

By Kim Weiss
DURHAM — Modern houses allow us to live the way we actually live.  Alex Rosenberg, chairman of the g25825800000000000082d3ee645c5c07a9f6ad0dd62f3efa4f64efb01dPhilosophy Department at Duke University, and his wife, Martha Reeves, visiting professor of markets and management studies at Duke, were well aware of that concept when they hired the Raleigh-based design-build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction to create their one-story, 2,400-square-foot home in Durham.
Like many homeowners, Alex and Martha had come to realize that family and friends always congregated in the kitchen when they came for a visit or a dinner party. A Modern home’s open floor plan would allow them to combine kitchen, living room and dining room in one space with each element of the space flowing seamlessly into the other. And since the kitchen is the “heart” of most homes — especially for Martha, who loves to cook — they wanted their kitchen to be the physical center of their house. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:12:12+00:00December 19th, 2013|0 Comments

CARY MAGAZINE: "Dream Homes"

By Emily Uhland
The Modern Getaway, Bahama, NC
MAINBahama-Modern
Spacious open interiors, lack of ornamentation, expansive windows and inventive architecture are all characteristics of Modernist homes, and all are represented in this custom home designed and built by Raleigh’s Tonic Design and Construction. “The space between the structures — we thought about that just as much as we thought about the actual building,” said designer Katherine Hogan. READ MORE & VIEW THE GALLERY…

 

2013-05-29T17:51:04+00:00May 29th, 2013|2 Comments

AEC CAFE: "Smart-Stell Residence in Durham, USA, by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction"

a1171ab9By Sanjay Gangal
The clients wanted a new house but not a new neighborhood. On one of their daily walks they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The house, beyond repair, occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a small lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time, they said.
The design of the new house addresses two key site relationships: (1) the existing neighborhood and its contextual scale, and (2) the landscape of the lake. From the street, the new one-story house’s form is low, quiet, and horizontal, with the only real opening towards the street at the main entrance porch. Because this house would be a dramatic departure from the typical houses in the neighborhood, we sited it deeply into the property. READ MORE…

2012-12-18T16:31:21+00:00December 18th, 2012|0 Comments

ARCHITIZER: "Smart-Stell House"

a1171ab9One of [Tonic Design’s] clients is the founder and director of Triangle Modernist Houses, an award-winning, non-profit organization that documents, preserves and promotes modernist residential design. Naturally, he and his wife wanted a modern house. But they didn’t want to leave their old neighborhood. Then, on one of their daily walks in the neighborhood, they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The indistinct house was beyond repair, but it occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a beautiful lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time,” as they said. READ MORE

2012-11-30T20:27:42+00:00November 30th, 2012|3 Comments

INHABITAT.com: "Crabill House: A Modern & Energy Efficient Forest Shed in North Carolina"

By Bridgette Meinhold

The Crabill family bought a 5-acre forested lot in Hillsborough, NC and hired Tonic Design to build them a a simple, modern home that minimized its impact on the environment. They also had to stick to a budget and wanted a unique live/work space that inspired creativity. Tonic’s resulting design drew inspiration from regional agricultural structures and used simple and low maintenance materials to create a striking home that fit the needs of the family. Built for a modest $155 per sq ft, the Crabill House is energy efficient, avoids disturbing the natural environment, and maximizes natural lighting. READ MORE & SEE THE GALLERY…
2012-11-26T15:03:07+00:00November 26th, 2012|1 Comment

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Wins AIA NC's Only Residential Design Award

For a modern house in Hillsborough, North Carolina

November 20, 2012 (Raleigh NC) – Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, an award-winning design/build firm in Raleigh, NC, has received a Merit Award from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) for its design and construction of the “Crabill Modern” house in Hillsborough, NC.
It was the only residential project to win an AIA NC design award this year.
This simple, modern home is located in a clearing amidst a lush, five-acre forest. The Crabills wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and to accommodate local wildlife.
“They also wanted a unique live-work house that provides interesting spatial overlaps,” said project designer Katherine Hogan, who co-owns of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction with her husband, designer Vinny Petraca. “And they wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way.”
The house is sited to avoid disturbing the environment, to maximize natural lighting and ventilation, and to frame views of forest, including a three-trunked tree.
To reflect the rural setting, the design references regional agricultural structures yet renders them in a modern composition using simple, inexpensive materials. Recalling old farm sheds, the house’s skewed cubic form is clad in solid and perforated COR-TEN®, a steel alloy developed to eliminate the need for painting. The steel forms a stable rust-like appearance when exposed to the weather. As a result, the house will be a constantly evolving element in the landscape as a rich patina develops over the years. The COR-TEN also acts as a rain screen, canopy, sunshade, and visual screen.
Spray foam insulation, tightly sealed ducts, low-e glazed windows, and Energy Star® appliances contribute to the home’s energy conservation. Despite the fact that their new house is 800 feet larger than their previous house, the Crabills report that their energy bills are, on average, 30 percent lower.
The first floor includes the entry, a spacious kitchen/living/dining room, a studio/music space, and two decks. The second floor includes the master bedroom suite and two bedrooms for the Crabills’ children, who share an extra loft space and bath.
Tonic Construction completed the house for $155 per square foot, due in large part to the design/build process and the creative use of materials.
The annual AIA NC Design Awards celebrate the achievements of architects and designers across the state and recognize a select group of diverse projects that distinguish themselves both in response to their clients’ needs and design excellence. For more information, visit www.ncaia.org.
For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, go to www.tonic-design.com.

2012-11-20T21:25:22+00:00November 20th, 2012|0 Comments

INHABITAT.com: "Rustic GREENville House In North Carolina is Powered by both Solar and Geothermal Energy"

by , 10/19/12
Tonic Design has been on the green beat from the start with their contemporary, environmentally friendly home designs. This is particularly true of the GREENville residence located in the North Carolina city with the same name. The home’s striking program is defined by bars and panels, and it is powered by both solar and geothermal energy. It also features a slew of passive design techniques that further reduce its carbon footprint. READ MORE

2012-10-22T17:31:00+00:00October 22nd, 2012|0 Comments

CONTEMPORIST: "Chiles Residence by Tonic Design + Construction"

Tonic Design + Construction provided a contemporary re-design for a mid-century modern house in Raleigh, North Carolina, that was in terrible condition after being abandoned in the 1960s.
The modern 3500-square-foot house was designed and built for art collectors John and Molly Chiles. It was constructed on the bones of an old modern, steel-framed and wood-paneled house overlooking Crabtree Creek in Raleigh, NC, that was abandoned in the 1960s.The original house was in terrible shape: Its wood walls and floors, camouflaged by kudzu and ivy, had rotted. Yet the “bones” were still strong in concept, and the couple saw through the clutter. They were confidant that the neglected remains could form the basis for a dramatic new house that would pay homage to mid-20th century modern design. READ MORE…

2012-10-18T22:45:32+00:00October 18th, 2012|0 Comments

DWELL: "Region of Honor"

The Crabill House


Tuned into its sylvan setting, this affordable green home in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is a modern take on the surrounding centuries-old structures.
By Diana Budds
Historic barns dot the countryside around Hillsborough, a region that traces its agricultural roots to the 1750s. So when John and Stacy Crabill contacted Tonic to design their new home, the firm gleaned inspiration from the local typology while taking things in a decidedly modern direction.
“They really trusted us to do something different,” says Tonic’s architectural designer, Katherine Hogan. READ MORE…

2012-03-12T19:07:27+00:00March 12th, 2012|0 Comments

INFORM: "Design Between The Lines"

The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer

The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer


By Georgia Bizios, FAIA, and Katie Wakeford
Bobby and Kristi Walters hired Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, sibling businesses based in Raleigh, North Carolina to help them create what would ultimately be a 4,000 square-foot home for a growing family on a three acre site.  It’s a contemporary home that exceeds their aspirations thanks to green strategies and smart process.
Projcted to receive LEED Silver Certification from the USGBC, the Tonic team pursued energy-efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, durability, and occupant health and comfort. Features include geothermal heating and cooling, rainwater collection in an underground cistern for irrigation, solar hot water with a tankless backup system, and low maintenance, highly durable materials such as zinc and cedar siding. READ MORE…

2010-04-12T16:10:19+00:00April 12th, 2010|0 Comments