/Tag: modern architecture

CUSTOM HOME: "Hillcrest House Addition — An Innovative Approach To Old + New"

CUSTOM HOME: “Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach To Old + New”

Tonic Design Modern Addition to Old Traditional House

During design development, a sectional opportunity presented itself that would avoid a head-on collision between old and new: a slender, double-height transitional space.
Photo by Keith Isaacs; diagram by Tonic Design

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The project involved designing a modern, 1500-square-foot addition for a two-story, red brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 in a historic inner-city neighborhood with narrow lots and minimal set-backs between houses. The addition would become the primary hub of activity for a growing family and an ideal space for entertaining. Programmatically, it would include an open kitchen, dining, living area and a spacious master bedroom suite... READ MORE 

2018-11-08T15:51:09+00:00July 20th, 2018|0 Comments

DWELL.com: "Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach to Old + New"

DWELL.com: “Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach to Old + New”

Tonic Design modern addition in Cameron Park.

A red brick Georgian Revival house built in 1916 welcomes a modern, glass and steel addition on a narrow lot in Raleigh’s Cameron Park neighborhood.

The project involved designing a modern, 1500-square-foot addition for a two-story, red brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 in a historic inner-city neighborhood with narrow lots and minimal set-backs between houses. The addition would become the primary hub of activity for a growing family and an ideal space for entertaining. Programmatically, it would include an open kitchen, dining, living area and a spacious master bedroom suite.

Tonic Design modern addition to historic house

Inside the Hillcrest addition.

Inside the Hillcrest addition.To uphold the general scale of this neighborhood and the manner in which the existing house has addressed the street for over 100 years, the addition’s mass is held within the outer planes of the old house, tucked against its rear elevation. And unlike other proposals the owners had seen, the plan divided the public and private spaces between two stories rather than letting the new construction consume the majority of the property. As a result, the architects retained a generous backyard for outdoor play space.

For the exterior walls, the architects chose Corten® steel because it is as durable as the old house’s brick veneer and it relates to its color tones. The wood siding at the rear elevation adds an element of warmth to the rugged steel, similar to the way in which the old house’s white wood trim creates softer edges against the brick.
How the existing house and the new construction linked together structurally presented the challenge. READ MORE…

2018-11-08T15:56:51+00:00July 16th, 2018|0 Comments

Steel-Clad House in Duke Forest Receives 2018 AIA Triangle Honor Award

Steel-Clad House in Duke Forest Receives 2018 AIA Triangle Honor Award

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Street-facing facade

Piedmont Retreat,” a modern, single-family home clad in Cor-Ton® steel, earned for Tonic Design of Raleigh, NC, one of only three Honor awards — and the only residential design among the three — in the 2018 AIA Triangle Design Awards. The awards were presented March 22 during a gala event at the Contemporary Art Museum in downtown Raleigh.
Partners in life and practice, Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca have now received 10 AIA Triangle Design Awards for the practice. This is their third honor award.

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Rear elevation overlooking the forest.

According to the partners, the clients wanted their new house to have a modest public presence and a direct connection to their property’s wooded landscape within its cul-de-sac neighborhood on the edge of Durham within Duke Forest. They also wanted a private, comfortable, low-maintenance house that would blur the boundaries between indoor and outdoor spaces.
Minimal in form and materials, Piedmont Retreat’s steel exterior forms a protective barrier to the street and presents a humble profile to the neighborhood. This rugged, weathering skin will eventually find its final patina and blend into the landscape.

Piedmont Retreat-23 copy_0

Inside Tonic Design’s award-winning “Piedmont Retreat”

In contrast, the living spaces open to an array of shifting perspectival views within and throughout the house.
Alex Anmahian, AIA, founding partner of the internationally acclaimed firm AW in Cambridge, MA, served as chair of the all-Boston jury. Anmahian, who teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University GSD, announced the winners, noting that the jury admired Tonic Design’s “consistency of message” throughout the submission and the “restrained palette of materials and textures,” among other attributes.
SM_Piedmont Retreat3 copy
“We’re especially honored to have our work recognized by this year’s jury,” Hogan said, “all of whom are highly respected, practicing professors of architecture.”
Seven design awards were presented this year: three Honor and four Merit. Click here for more information on the 2018 AIA Triangle Design Awards. Click here for more information on Tonic Design.

2018-11-05T15:26:44+00:00March 26th, 2018|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "The Kamphoefner Prize"

NEWS & OBSERVER: “The Kamphoefner Prize”

Modern architects Raleigh, NC

Katherine and Vinny with The Kamphoefner Prize certificate.

By J. Michael Welton
(Following a tribute to the late Brian Shawcorft, FAIA)
One of the most coveted prizes in North Carolina architecture is the award for modern design established by Henry and Mabel Kamphoefner in 1988. It was first given to Norman Pease Jr. – and to Shawcroft in 1991.
The Kamphoefners set a high bar, seeking an architect or firm that “demonstrated a consistent integrity and devotion over an acceptable period of time to further the development of the modern movement in architecture without yielding to any of the undesirable current clichés, neo-modernistic mannerisms or artless historicism that have flawed the building culture of today.”
Lofty? Yes. Opinionated? Absolutely. But North Carolina’s modern architecture is built upon these standards. This award is designed to encourage great work – no matter the age of the winners.
In 2017, it went to Raleigh’s Tonic Design – and partners Vinny Petrarca, 45, and Katherine Hogan, 36. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:30:31+00:00February 4th, 2018|0 Comments

METAL ARCHITECTURE: "A Modern Retreat"

METAL ARCHITECTURE: “A Modern Retreat”

Corten steel helps residence blend into surroundings seamlessly.

By Marcy Marro Editor

Tonic Design

Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

Located in a wooded cul-de-sac neighborhood in Durham, N.C., this single-family residence, nicknamed Piedmont Retreat, is wrapped in vertical Corten steel panels facing the street, and vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows in the back that overlook the surrounding forest.

The owners reached out to Raleigh, N.C.-based Tonic Design and Tonic Construction to design and build the residence. “It’s a corner lot,” says Vincent Petrarca, co-owner, designer and contractor at Tonic Design, “so the house really had to respond to the two streets. And for us, trying to create a place that’s calm and a getaway, the idea of even a few streetlights at night on the corner, the house really had to turn its back on the street. So the house created this hard shell to that side of the property, and then it really opens up, like a geode, looking down the Piedmont ravine into the mature forest.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:30:54+00:00December 12th, 2017|0 Comments

CUSTOM BUILDER: "Backstory: Playing Both Sides"

CUSTOM BUILDER: “Backstory: Playing Both Sides”

A creative duo’s partnership is driven by client needs, site specifics, and school schedules

By Stacey Freed

Masonry, glass, metal, concrete … these are the building materials that Vincent “Vinny” Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, owners of the firms Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, in Raleigh, N.C., favor. “These things last over time,” Hogan says. “For over 20 years, we’ve been watching as our projects age and evolve,” she adds. The couple believes it all comes down to detailing and materials. Petrarca and Hogan, whose work has won numerous awards, put great stock in the idea that every project they do is unique—with a “particular site, a client with a vision, a budget,” Petrarca says. READ MORE…
2018-11-05T15:33:39+00:00October 5th, 2017|0 Comments

NCSU Adjunct Faculty Member Vincent Petrarca Receives ACSA Faculty Design Award

NCSU Adjunct Faculty Member Vincent Petrarca Receives ACSA Faculty Design Award

For a Modernist house designed and built by his firm Tonic Design +
Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

Vincent Petrarca

Tonic Construction

 

Vincent Petrarca, an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Architecture at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and a founding partner of the Raleigh, NC-based design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, has received a prestigious 2013-2014 Faculty Design Award from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) for his design of “Crabill Modern,” a Modernist, single-family house in Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Each year, the ACSA honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, and service. 

 

The ASCA’s Faculty Design Awards honor built work that “advances the reflective nature of practice and teaching by recognizing and encouraging outstanding work in architecture and related environmental design fields as a critical endeavor,” according to the ACSA. Winning professors “inspire and challenge students, contribute to the profession’s knowledge base, and extend their work beyond the borders of academy into practice and the public sector.”

 

Petrarca explained the evolution of Crabill Modern’s award-winning design:

 

“We began with the most efficient and economical plan form: a rectangle with plan functions divided into quadrants. We then challenged and re-envisioned the box based on the patterns of use and lifestyle of the family. These transformations created a plan where the more important spaces grew larger. These moves began to push and pull the building’s protective skin, creating dynamic elevations. The resulting form was a simple box, protected and augmented by an inexpensive but highly articulated shell.”

 

That shell reflects the rural setting: Petrarca specified simple, inexpensive materials and references to regional agricultural structures that would be rendered in a modern architecture composition. Recalling old farm sheds, the house’s skewed cubic form is clad in solid and perforated COR-TEN®, a steel alloy that eliminates the need for painting. The steel forms a stable rust-like appearance as it weathers. As a result, the house will be a constantly evolving element in the landscape as a rich patina develops over the years. The COR-TEN also acts as a rain screen, canopy, sunshade, and visual screen.

 

Petrarca included a variety of energy conservation principles in the Crabill home. Consequently, the owners report that, even though this house is 800 feet larger than their previous home, their energy bills average 30 percent less.

 

Tonic Construction completed the home for $155 per square foot due in large part, Petrarca says, to the design/build process and readily available materials, including oak.

 

Vincent Petrara will receive the Faculty Design Award during the ASCA’s 102nd Annual Meeting, to be held in Miami Beach April 10-12, hosted by Florida International University.

 

For more information on the ASCA and the Educational Awards Program, visit www.acsa-arch.org.

 

For more information on Vincent Petrarca and his firm, visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

2018-11-07T03:11:15+00:00February 17th, 2014|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "A core of simplicity"

Interior, the GREENville House


By Laura Battaglia
Bobby Walters had always been drawn to the simplicity and clean lines of modern architecture. But a modern aesthetic was not his only requirement as he planned a house for himself and his wife. Walters was also interested in sustainable features and cost-conscious decisions. In essence, he wanted to build a better house.
A radiologist by profession, Walters relates his sense of design and attention to detail to his work analyzing radiology images. He worked with Tonic Design on scheme after scheme; a process that his wife, Kristi, called a “five-year affair.” As the design developed, the team realized that their design was inherently “green.” The overriding concept of the Greenville residence is a series of wings that extend from a central core living area into the landscape in a pinwheel fashion. This allows for visual connections, breezes and natural daylight – all features of a design engaged with its environment… READ MORE…
2010-06-26T20:21:56+00:00June 26th, 2010|0 Comments