/MEDIA COVERAGE

MIDTOWN MAGAZINE: Breathing Space – Tonic Design brought to life one couple’s abstract dreams of a tree house.

MIDTOWN MAGAZINE: “Breathing Space – Tonic brought to life one couple’s abstract dreams of a tree house”

Text & Photography by Mick Schulte

Windows stretch floor to ceiling in the modern-style dream home of Jonathan and Ilsy Chappell.

The home, built in 2011, was designed to fulfill their love of the outdoors. They effectively created a modern oasis, tucked in the middle of traditional homes, in Raleigh’s Budleigh neighborhood. The couple, along with twins Hudson and Sienna, experience nature intimately from morning to night.

... READ MORE 

2019-03-27T19:12:14+00:00March 27th, 2019|0 Comments

CUSTOM HOME: "Hillcrest House Addition — An Innovative Approach To Old + New"

CUSTOM HOME: “Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach To Old + New”

Tonic Design Modern Addition to Old Traditional House

During design development, a sectional opportunity presented itself that would avoid a head-on collision between old and new: a slender, double-height transitional space.
Photo by Keith Isaacs; diagram by Tonic Design

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The project involved designing a modern, 1500-square-foot addition for a two-story, red brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 in a historic inner-city neighborhood with narrow lots and minimal set-backs between houses. The addition would become the primary hub of activity for a growing family and an ideal space for entertaining. Programmatically, it would include an open kitchen, dining, living area and a spacious master bedroom suite... READ MORE 

2018-11-08T15:51:09+00:00July 20th, 2018|0 Comments

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST: "11 Must-See Houses in The Woods: Beautiful Modern Forest Houses"

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST: “11 Must-See Houses in The Woods: Beautiful Modern Forest Houses”

A house in the woods doesn’t have to be rustic….

1700 Glenwood

…Piedmont Retreat

Durham, North Carolina
Tonic Design devised this Corten steel–clad home in a wooded neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina. The exterior is designed to weather and eventually blend in with the surroundings. The rear of the two-story, 3,800-square-foot house is glazed to take advantage of the forest views. READ MORE

2018-11-08T15:58:16+00:00June 2nd, 2018|0 Comments

ARCH DAILY.com: "Piedmont Retreat/Tonic Design"

ARCH DAILY.com: “Piedmont Retreat/Tonic Design”

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Rear elevation overlooking the forest. (Tzu Chen Photography)

Wrapped in vertical stripes of Corten® steel street-side, with vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows overlooking the forest behind it, a modern house sits quietly in the corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham.
Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design in Raleigh are responsible for this creative two-story, 3800-square-foot, single-family structure that will, as the steel continues to weather, blend into the natural setting and never need painting. Their clients loved the concept since they wanted a low-maintenance house with a modest public presence.
The owners also wanted to maintain a direct visual connection to their beautiful wooded site. The abundant glazing fulfills that wish. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:26:37+00:00April 27th, 2018|0 Comments

METAL ARCHITECTURE: "A Modern Retreat"

METAL ARCHITECTURE: “A Modern Retreat”

Corten steel helps residence blend into surroundings seamlessly.

By Marcy Marro Editor

Tonic Design

Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

Located in a wooded cul-de-sac neighborhood in Durham, N.C., this single-family residence, nicknamed Piedmont Retreat, is wrapped in vertical Corten steel panels facing the street, and vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows in the back that overlook the surrounding forest.

The owners reached out to Raleigh, N.C.-based Tonic Design and Tonic Construction to design and build the residence. “It’s a corner lot,” says Vincent Petrarca, co-owner, designer and contractor at Tonic Design, “so the house really had to respond to the two streets. And for us, trying to create a place that’s calm and a getaway, the idea of even a few streetlights at night on the corner, the house really had to turn its back on the street. So the house created this hard shell to that side of the property, and then it really opens up, like a geode, looking down the Piedmont ravine into the mature forest.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:30:54+00:00December 12th, 2017|0 Comments

INHABITAT: "Weathered steel and reclaimed materials blend a modern home into the woods."

INHABITAT: “Weathered steel and reclaimed materials blend a modern home into the woods.”

Tonic Design

Corten® steel provides a modest, low-maintenance exterior (it will never need painting) that will eventually weather to blend into the natural setting. Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

by Lucy Wang
Raleigh-based Tonic Design completed a creative new home that plays with the contrast between old and new through the use of reclaimed and contemporary materials. Tucked into the forests of Durham, the Piedmont Retreat is a 3,800-square-foot single-family home that embraces the outdoors in its use of weathered materials and large cantilevered windows. Reclaimed materials, like oak flooring and factory lights, help soften the modern steel and glass construction. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:31:17+00:00December 11th, 2017|0 Comments

CUSTOM BUILDER: "Backstory: Playing Both Sides"

CUSTOM BUILDER: “Backstory: Playing Both Sides”

A creative duo’s partnership is driven by client needs, site specifics, and school schedules

By Stacey Freed

Masonry, glass, metal, concrete … these are the building materials that Vincent “Vinny” Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, owners of the firms Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, in Raleigh, N.C., favor. “These things last over time,” Hogan says. “For over 20 years, we’ve been watching as our projects age and evolve,” she adds. The couple believes it all comes down to detailing and materials. Petrarca and Hogan, whose work has won numerous awards, put great stock in the idea that every project they do is unique—with a “particular site, a client with a vision, a budget,” Petrarca says. READ MORE…
2018-11-05T15:33:39+00:00October 5th, 2017|0 Comments

Walter Magazine Features Lowe’s Pavillion

Walter Magazine Features Lowe’s Pavillion

ILowes-Pavilion-NCMA.jpgn their latest issue, Walter Magazine features unique minimalist structures in the Triangle area.
Spotlighting Lowe’s Pavillon and other NCMA architectural pieces, the writer notes:

They’re diversions in the landscape, placed to punctuate and celebrate the visual richness of the grounds. But they’re not only meant to be seen – they also provide a vantage point to better appreciate the beauty of their own surroundings.

Read more at WalterMagazine.com.

2018-11-05T15:35:37+00:00November 2nd, 2016|0 Comments

N&O: A New Model for Architecture

N&O: A New Model for Architecture

t1003-Audio-Buys (1)

1700 Glenwood

The News and Observer shares the advantages of an architect-led design-build. Read more. They feature 1700 Glenwood, a current tonic project:
1700 Glenwood, Tonic Design and Tonic Construction
A vintage 1965 midcentury modern landmark, 1700 Glenwood has benefitted from two renovations at the hands of Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan. The first, in 2011, was a classic design-build for a new aesthetic and a reduction in solar gain. That meant energy-efficient glass, a sunscreen and a zinc skin – all for $180,000. “We were working backward from the dollar amount,” Petrarca says. “If we’d bid it out, it would have blown the budget, and the first thing they’d take out would be the sunscreen.” Today they’re working as architects on a new renovation there – with contractors Riley Lewis. And though it’s a traditional process, design-build prepped them for the job. “We’re working with them and talking to them like contractors,” Hogan says. “That’s why the project has gone smoothly, even though it’s fast-tracked.”

2018-11-05T16:01:29+00:00August 23rd, 2016|0 Comments

Triangle Business Journal: The plans for Raleigh’s 1700 Glenwood building in Five Points

Triangle Business Journal: The plans for Raleigh’s 1700 Glenwood building in Five Points

t1003-Audio-Buys (1)

1700 Glenwood

New owners of the old Audio Buys building at Five Points in Raleigh will soon be bringing new people and commerce back into the 1960s-era, Modernist-style building.
Rick Carol Marcotte, owners of the Form & Function interior design and store store on Bernard Street, purchased the odd, two-story building at the corner point at Glenwood Avenue, Whitaker Mill Road and Fairview Road in December, and the couple has recently started releasing details about their plans there. Read more on BizJournals.com.

2018-11-05T16:01:20+00:00April 29th, 2016|0 Comments

Builder Magazine

Builder Magazine features tonic’s design of the contemporary kitchen in the Hawthorne Residence:

builder

NORTH CAROLINA KITCHEN FACILITATES FAMILY INTERACTION

Sophisticated design touches balance a kid-friendly layout in this contemporary Raleigh home.

By Jennifer Goodman

This contemporary kitchen makes entertaining friends and family or even just cooking for the kids fun and easy. It was designed to allow the homeowners to prepare meals or socialize while keeping an eye on their children. The youngsters can play in the backyard just beyond the large sliding glass doors while mom and dad get dinner ready, hang out with friends, or do the dishes—all the while within sight of each other. 

Read the article on Builder.com.

2018-11-05T15:59:34+00:00January 6th, 2016|0 Comments

2015 Dwell Design Guide

2015 Dwell Design Guide

tonic is featured in this year’s Dwell’s Definitive List of Architects and Designers Worldwide:

2018-11-05T15:59:09+00:00December 21st, 2015|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "Modest modern for simple living in Cameron Park"

NEWS & OBSERVER: “Modest modern for simple living in Cameron Park”

Contributed report by Kim Weiss

tonic design, Modernist house in Cameron Park

View from the living space at the front of the house all the way to the backyard.

“Modest Modern” — that’s what Abby Ross calls the new house in Raleigh’s Cameron Park neighborhood that she shares with her husband, Sean, and their children Noah, 7, and Chloe, 4.
Designed and built by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction of Raleigh, the Rosses’ one-story 1700sf house became a two-story 3400sf Modern house with clean lines, clear volumes, open multi-use spaces, and a strong connection between indoors and outdoors. Yet its size and siting (in line with its neighbors), and exterior materials (charcoal and gray concrete rain-screen panels with wood detailing), make this Modern house a quiet, friendly addition to Cameron Park’s established neighborhood west of downtown Raleigh…
Click on the links below to see the entire article:
N&O: Modest Modern
N&O: Modest Modern, page 2

2018-11-05T16:04:50+00:00October 20th, 2014|0 Comments

THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER: "Inside Architecture’s One-Stop Shop"

THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER: “Inside Architecture’s One-Stop Shop”

Anna Bergren Miller looks into how architect-led design-build can deliver more for less. 
ART AS SHELTER, RALEIGH, NC, TONIC DESIGN.

ART AS SHELTER, RALEIGH, NC, TONIC DESIGN.

“The typical process of architecture is broken.” So begins a slideshow on the website of GLUCK+, the New York firm known for its practice—and advocacy—of architect-led design build. Design-build differs from conventional project delivery in that a single firm is responsible for both design and construction. Proponents of the method argue that by repairing the breach between architecture and building design-build benefits both clients and architects, and produces better designs…
…Clients save money under design-build, though how much is up for debate. BUILD suggests that the process reduces project costs by about 10 percent. The most widely cited figures, touted by the Design-Build Institute of America and other proponents of the method, come from a 16-year-old study by the Construction Industry Institute (CII) and Penn State, which found that design-build lowered unit costs 6.1 percent over design-bid-build. For Katherine Hogan, co-owner of tonic design | tonic construction in Raleigh, North Carolina, the financial advantage of design-build is harder to pin down, yet nonetheless real. “There are efficiencies in the process,” she said. “It’s not percentage-wise that there’s a savings, but there’s a cost savings in time, management, and responsibility.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T16:04:30+00:00August 22nd, 2014|0 Comments

URBAN HOME: "Brought Back To Life"

URBAN HOME: “Brought Back To Life”

The Chiles residence in Raleigh.

The Chiles residence in Raleigh.By Anne Marie Ashley
August/September 2014 — Abandoned in the 1960s, this old steel-framed and woodpaneled home on a hilltop overlooking Crabtree Creek seemed unredeemable to everyone but the Chiles’. Through the kudzu covered walls and rotted, ivy-ridden wood they could see a pristine, modern home that would pay proper homage to the Mid-Century Modern structure it once was. It reminded them of Pierre Koenig’s homes in the California hills, they would say. The bones of the home were strong and their vision clear, and the couple began a year-long journey to build a living gallery full of art, light and open spaces.

The Chiles’ called on Tonic Design in Raleigh to help them reconstruct the home, knowing their design/build model would be ideal for this type of project. “The clients came to us wanting the most loft-like home and home-like loft,” says Vincent Petrarca, lead designer at Tonic. “They felt we could help them realize their dream of a modern home.” Having visited other significant architectural projects like Falling Water done by Frank Lloyd Wright and Villa Savoye outside of Paris designed by Le Corbusier, the Chiles’ recognized the details that they were drawn to and could use these as a reference point when designing the new home. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:04:32+00:00August 6th, 2014|0 Comments

ARCHITECTS+ARTISANS: "Six Winners in Matsumoto Competition"

ARCHITECTS+ARTISANS: “Six Winners in Matsumoto Competition”

Three jury-selected modern homes and three “people’s choice” houses are the winners in the 2014 Matsumoto

The Smart-Stell house won First Place in the Jury Awards category. Photo by Todd Lanning.

The Smart-Stell house won First Place in the Jury Awards category. Photo by Todd Lanning.

Prize competition in North Carolina.
The six homes – from Durham, Leicester, Asheville, Wilmington, Raleigh, and Charlotte – made the final cut out of 12 total entries.
The competition, the third in as many years, is sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses. Its intent is to honor architect George Matsumoto, who once taught and built in the mid-century modern aesthetic in Raleigh. Recruited by Henry Kamphoefner to teach at N.C. State’s School of Design, Matsumoto practiced in North Carolina from 1948 to 1961.

“We want to encourage architects to continue the modernist movement,” says George Smart, executive director of the non-profit organization. “There are cash prizes of $3,000 for first place, $2,000 for second, and $1,000 for third. Designing houses is not a big moneymaker; it’s a labor of love, and this helps keep the architects going.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T16:10:03+00:00July 25th, 2014|0 Comments

Architect Katherine Hogan Wins 2014 Women In Business "Future Star" Award

Architect Katherine Hogan Wins 2014 Women In Business “Future Star” Award

Triangle Business Journal honors the president of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction.
Katherine Hogan, AIA (photo by John West)

Katherine Hogan, AIA (photo by John West)

Katherine Hogan, AIA, partner and principal of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh, has received a 2014 Women in Business Award from Triangle Business Journal (TBJ) in the “Future Star” category.
According to TBJ, the Women in Business Awards program recognizes Triangle women “who have proven to be dynamic and outstanding leaders with established track records of significant accomplishments in business and/or community service.”

Hogan, 32, is a licensed architect and a LEED-accredited professional. Last year, the national professional journal Residential Architect named Hogan and her partner/husband, Vincent Petrarca, 2013’s “Rising Stars” out of all young architects/architectural firms in the nation. Also in 2013, Green Building & Design, a national magazine focused on sustainable design and construction, singled Hogan out as an “Architect To Watch.”

Hogan joined the Raleigh design-build firm in 2008. Since then, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has completed over 50 projects and received 20 major design awards and other honors, including a national American Institute of Architects (AIA) Small Projects Award for the Lowe’s Pavilion in the North Carolina Museum of Art Sculpture Garden. Since Hogan joined the firm, Tonic has become nationally known for Modern, cost-effective, environmentally sustainable projects, especially residential and small-scale commercial projects.

Katherine Hogan is a regularly invited juror for undergraduate and graduate student design reviews at the NC State University College of Design. She has been a guest juror at her alma mater, the Syracuse University School of Architecture, where she also serves on the School’s Advisory Board.

Hogan has been an active member of the AIA Triangle Design Awards Committee for four years and, this year, is serving as vice chair of the committee. She is also a member of the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Contemporaries Board, and she actively participates in events sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to Modernist residential design.

Nearly 400 business leaders from across the Triangle gathered for lunch at the Raleigh Marriott City Center to honor this year’s Triangle Business Journal Women in Business Award winners. For more information on the awards program and the ceremony, click here.

For more information on Katherine Hogan and Tonic Design + Tonic Construction visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-07T03:09:00+00:00April 16th, 2014|0 Comments

NCSU TECHNICIAN: "Professor awarded for sustainable home design"

NCSU TECHNICIAN: “Professor awarded for sustainable home design”

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture recently awarded adjunct N.C. State architecture professor Vincent Petrarca the Faculty Design Award, for his modern single-family home design.

Petrarca, a co-owner, designer and contractor of Tonic Design, was the mastermind behind the award-winning, environmentally-friendly house located in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Petrarca, an adjunct professor at the University, said N.C. State had a huge impact on his success as an architect.  READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:10:48+00:00February 28th, 2014|0 Comments

DURHAM HERALD: "Rosenberg-Reeves Home Designed For How People Actually Live"

DURHAM HERALD: “Rosenberg-Reeves Home Designed For How People Actually Live”

By Kim Weiss
DURHAM — Modern houses allow us to live the way we actually live.  Alex Rosenberg, chairman of the g25825800000000000082d3ee645c5c07a9f6ad0dd62f3efa4f64efb01dPhilosophy Department at Duke University, and his wife, Martha Reeves, visiting professor of markets and management studies at Duke, were well aware of that concept when they hired the Raleigh-based design-build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction to create their one-story, 2,400-square-foot home in Durham.
Like many homeowners, Alex and Martha had come to realize that family and friends always congregated in the kitchen when they came for a visit or a dinner party. A Modern home’s open floor plan would allow them to combine kitchen, living room and dining room in one space with each element of the space flowing seamlessly into the other. And since the kitchen is the “heart” of most homes — especially for Martha, who loves to cook — they wanted their kitchen to be the physical center of their house. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:12:12+00:00December 19th, 2013|0 Comments

DESIGNBLOOM: "tonic design cubed volume for remote rank residence"

DESIGNBLOOM: “tonic design cubed volume for remote rank residence”

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

The Rank Residence

located on the edge of a forest and deeply rooted into the property, the ‘rank residence’ by american firm tonic design offers a high level of privacy within its vertical structure. designed for recording artist michael rank, the black and white house in north carolina is reminiscent of piano keys with narrow windows placed to suggest notes on the staffs of sheet music. the 3200-square-foot cubic volume consists of four levels, with a 1100-square-foot four-car garage beneath to hold the owner’s ‘muscle’ cars. the main living space is expressed on the exterior by painted concrete panels, while the upper two levels are clad in factory-finished, black standing-seam metal roofing material. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:13:05+00:00November 2nd, 2013|0 Comments

Residential Architect Magazine Names Raleigh Firm 2013’s "Rising Star"

Residential Architect Magazine Names Raleigh Firm 2013’s “Rising Star”

Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan receive one of the national journal’s VP, KH_sm.jpbannual Leadership Awards.

 

October 17, 2013 (Raleigh, NC) – Last weekend, Residential Architect Magazine presented home designers Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, partners in the Raleigh-based firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, with its 2013 Rising Star Leadership Award. The presentation took place during a luncheon held at the Wyndham Hotel in San Francisco, CA, as part of the annual Reinvention Symposium sponsored by Residential Architect’s publisher, Hanley Wood.

Since Tonic was founded in 2003, the design-build firm has completed a steady stream of private residences, many of which have received design awards from the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) South Atlantic Region, AIA North Carolina, AIA Triangle, and other design awards programs.

In 2006, Tonic’s dramatic rehabilitation/renovation of a mid-century house in Raleigh, the Chiles Residence, made the final list for World Architecture News’ “House of the Year.”

In 2005, a kitchen design-build project received a Merit Award from Custom Homes magazine.

In 2008, the Chiles Residence received a Custom Homes Merit Award. In 2009 the same project received one of Raleigh, NC’s Sir Walter Raleigh Appearance Commission awards.

In 2010, a house Tonic designed and built for a family in Greenville, NC, received AIA North Carolina’s Gail Lindsey Award for sustainability.

And this year, the “Modern Gothic” house Tonic designed and built in Pittsboro, NC, for a local recording artist received First Prize in the George Matsumoto Prize competition sponsored by NC Modernist Houses (www.ncmodernist.org).

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has also received high honors for non-residential work. The shelter structure the firm designed and built for the North Carolina’s Museum of Art’s Sculpture Garden, entitled “Art as Shelter,” has received five design awards, including the national AIA’s 2010 Small Project Award for “Architecture in the Public Interest.”

In the article on this year’s Rising Star Award, contributor Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson points out that “Petrarca, 41, and Hogan, 32, don’t bring a signature sensibility to their work. Each residence presents an entirely distinctive vision, which, it turns out, is the connective tissue of Tonic….What threads through every Tonic project is a reverence for material, a respect for the site and the budget, and what Hogan calls a ‘modern sensitivity.’”

Residential Architect has also published Tonic’s private residences on several occasions. And when the magazine launched a new video series that explores the importance of residential design and the value architects bring to the housing industry, the editors included an interview with Hogan and Petrarca.

Rising Star is one of three Leadership Awards the magazine presents each year along with its annual Design Awards. The Reinvention Symposium is the only high-level national conference devoted exclusively to the residential design professional. For more information on the magazine, go to www.residentialarchitect.com.

For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

2018-11-07T03:13:55+00:00October 18th, 2013|0 Comments

DWELL: "A Gothic Inspired Modern Home"

DWELL: “A Gothic Inspired Modern Home”

By Diana Buddsrank-residence-exterior-rectangle
Modernism’s crisp lines and ornament-free surfaces bear little resemblance to Gothic architecture’s gingerbread house–like flourishes. But in the North Carolina residence belonging to a musician and his son, Medieval structures informed the contemporary design. Michael Rank approached Raleigh-based firm Tonic to create a house that emphasized his love of tall, vertical spaces and staircases. A professional musician, Rank also requested space for a recording studio. Privacy was paramount as was room for his collection of art and muscle cars. Tonic took all the requirements and delivered a thoughtfully planned two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath house at about $200 per square foot. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:14:21+00:00October 16th, 2013|0 Comments

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT, 2013 LEADERSHIP AWARDS: "Rising Star: Tonic Design | Tonic Construction"

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT, 2013 LEADERSHIP AWARDS: “Rising Star: Tonic Design | Tonic Construction”

Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan don’t have a singular style, but they do have a distinctive vision.

By Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson

Katherine Hogan and Vincent Petrarca of Tonic Design | Tonic Construction, in their Raleigh, N.C., studio. (Photo by Ian Allen)

Katherine Hogan and Vincent Petrarca of Tonic Design | Tonic Construction, in their Raleigh, N.C., studio.
(Photo by Ian Allen)

Look through the portfolio of houses designed and built by the Raleigh, N.C.–based Tonic Design | Tonic Construction. While the architecture is decidedly modern in inspiration, zeroing in on a singular style isn’t easy. In the Rank Residence, completed last year, a dramatic, Gothic-inspired four-story home uses slender windows and a dizzying stair design to play off vertical space. The Smart-Stell Residence, by contrast, is a quieter, one-story, horizontal home with vast expanses of glass. Each residence presents an entirely distinctive vision, which, it turns out, is the connective tissue of Tonic.
“Look at two of our houses and they couldn’t be more different,” says Vincent Petrarca, Assoc. AIA, who co-founded Tonic a decade ago and now runs the firm with his wife and partner, Katherine Hogan, Assoc. AIA. “We are good at figuring out what each project is about and not making it about us.”
This doesn’t mean, of course, that Petrarca, 41, and Hogan, 32, don’t bring a signature sensibility to their work. What threads through every Tonic project is a reverence for material, a respect for the site and the budget, and what Hogan calls a “modern sensitivity.”
“We try to be really good listeners with our clients,” Hogan says, “and we try to involve them while also providing good design and remaining sensitive to the context.” READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:14:53+00:00October 14th, 2013|0 Comments

CHEVROLET.com – DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY: "With its sleek design and modernist appeal, the 2014 Impala is your dream car. How about a home to match?"

CHEVROLET.com – DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY: “With its sleek design and modernist appeal, the 2014 Impala is your dream car. How about a home to match?”

By Greg BarberaChevrolet Logo

You love your 2014 Impala. You love its sleek, sculpted lines and the smooth ride it offers courtesy of its eye-pleasing aerodynamic design. You love the masterful craftsmanship that has resulted in your rewarding driving experience. So what’s the problem? You really want the right place to park it—specifically, a home that matches your design sensibility and your Impala’s striking appearance and head-turning profile. Here’s a quick tour of stylish, modernist residences that might fit the bill.

This may come as a surprise to some people, but the Triangle area of North Carolina—which includes Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill—has the third largest concentration of modernist homes in the country. Only Los Angeles and Chicago have more. These are not just homesteads; like your vehicle, they’re pieces of art. Raleigh’s Tonic Design recently built a house for local musician Michael Rank that turns the heads of passersby… READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:15:19+00:00October 7th, 2013|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "AIA Triangle tour of homes takes place Oct. 5"

 NEWS & OBSERVER: “AIA Triangle tour of homes takes place Oct. 5”

Home & Garden – Living

Five Triangle-area homes displaying outstanding design features will be open to the public Saturday during the American Institute of Architects annual tour. Pictured here: the Lanning house by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

Five Triangle-area homes displaying outstanding design features will be open to the public Saturday during the American Institute of Architects annual tour. Pictured here: the Lanning house by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

Five Triangle-area homes displaying outstanding design features will be open to the public Saturday during the American Institute of Architects annual tour.
Four of the homes were chosen by a jury of architects based on criteria such as overall design, quality, ability to meet client needs, harmony with the site, and other factors. The fifth home is a 1957 award-winning design by James Murray Webb, formerly a member of the UNC-Chapel Hill City and Regional Planning School.
The homes will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost for the tour is $15 online through noon Saturday; $20 at the open home locations in Cary, Raleigh and Chapel Hill.
The self-guided tour is sponsored by the 750-member Triangle Section of the American Institute of Architects.
For details and a tour map, visit aiatriangletour.com.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/10/04/3250228/aia-triangle-tour-of-homes-takes.html#storylink=cpy
2018-11-07T03:15:44+00:00October 5th, 2013|0 Comments

Houzz.com: "Explore The Art of Light and Dark In Design"

Houzz.com: “Explore The Art of Light and Dark In Design”

By Jen Dalley, Houzz Contributor and architect

2018-11-07T03:16:23+00:00September 7th, 2013|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "NC Modernist Houses contest gives awards for outstanding new designs"

 Michael Rank's 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects and is the top winner in the George Matsumoto Prize competition. COURTESY OF RAYMOND GOODMAN


Michael Rank’s 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects and is the top winner in the George Matsumoto Prize competition.
COURTESY OF RAYMOND GOODMAN

 

If the term “modern architecture” brings to mind a stark style best suited to urban landscapes, you may do a double take when looking over this year’s George Matsumoto Prize winners.
The six new homes recently honored by the N.C. Modernist Houses contest range from a rustic mountain cabin to a coastal villa that sits lightly at the water’s edge as if poised to flit away. Yet what connects this diverse collection of homes are the staples of modernist architecture: functional form and a design that reflects each home’s location.
George Smart, founder of the nonprofit N.C. Modernist Houses (formerly known as Triangle Modernist Houses), says another common thread among the award winners was an emphasis on energy conservation.
“Sustainability and energy efficiency – those are very important qualities,” Smart said. “People want to have that option.” READ MORE…

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/08/16/3109769/nc-modernist-houses-contest-gives.html#storylink=cpy
2018-11-07T03:16:48+00:00August 19th, 2013|0 Comments

TRIANGLE BUSINESS JOURNAL: "Vinny Petrarca | People"

TRIANGLE BUSINESS JOURNAL: “Vinny Petrarca | People”

  • Vinny Petrarca, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

    Vinny Petrarca, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction. © Allen Weiss

    Date added:  May 31, 2013

  • Submission Type:  Professional Recognition
  • Current employer:  Tonic Design + Tonic Construction
  • Current title/position:  principal
  • Reason for being recognized:  Award-winning designer Vinny Petrarca has been selected to serve as a juror for the 2013 Builder’s Choice and Custom Home Design Awards, a national competition… VIEW POST
  • 2018-11-07T03:21:53+00:00June 3rd, 2013|0 Comments

    CARY MAGAZINE: "Dream Homes"

    By Emily Uhland
    The Modern Getaway, Bahama, NC
    MAINBahama-Modern
    Spacious open interiors, lack of ornamentation, expansive windows and inventive architecture are all characteristics of Modernist homes, and all are represented in this custom home designed and built by Raleigh’s Tonic Design and Construction. “The space between the structures — we thought about that just as much as we thought about the actual building,” said designer Katherine Hogan. READ MORE & VIEW THE GALLERY…

     

    2013-05-29T17:51:04+00:00May 29th, 2013|2 Comments

    GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN: "Architect To Watch – Katherine Hogan"

    Interview by Erin Brereton

    partner in the design-build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

    Katherine Hogan

    Katherine Hogan spent the first few years of her career at a nonprofit that provided design services to small, low-income rural communities. In 2008, she joined Raleigh, North Carolina-based Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, which recently received a Small Projects Practitioners award from the AIA for its pavilion at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Hogan, an associate AIA member and a LEED AP, is a partner at Tonic, alongside firm founder Vincent Petrarca. She spoke to gb&d about the benefits of being a builder and how she plans to keep pushing the industry forward.

    gb&d: How did your early work in your career help prepare you for your position at Tonic?

    Katherine Hogan: I worked for Will Bruder + Partners in Phoenix for a summer and got to go back full-time when I first graduated, which was a very wonderful experience. One of his descriptors of his work is that he always tries to find the extraordinary in the ordinary—to look at a material and try to use it differently and to examine space and context, which were all really good messages. I did a fellowship after that, where I worked in year increments on particular projects. A lot of the work was to further socially conscious design. I’ve done some really interesting projects and got to understand the client as not just someone who comes to you with a significant amount of money—the client is any person who needs a building.

    gb&d: You’ve been with Tonic Design since 2008. How did you come to specialize in residential and small-scale commercial projects? READ MORE…

     

     
     

    2013-05-08T03:18:07+00:00May 8th, 2013|0 Comments

    NEWS & OBSERVER: "In tune with gothic: Local rock musician's house sings with height & drama"

     Michael Rank's 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Photo courtesy of Raymond Goodman


    Michael Rank’s 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Photo
    courtesy of Raymond Goodman


     

    On the cover of his latest album, singer-songwriter Michael Rank walks down a dramatic concrete staircase that appears to lead endlessly upward behind him.
    But that staircase does end eventually – right at his front door.
    The stairs, the front door and even Rank himself are striking elements of a 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home that at once contrasts and complements the rolling, wooded land on which it is situated outside Pittsboro. The home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), and it is expected to be part of a tour later this year hosted by the Triangle Modernist Houses group. READ MORE…
    2013-04-29T15:11:11+00:00April 29th, 2013|0 Comments

    ARCHITIZER: "GREENville House (Walters Residence)"

    A project by Tonic Design | Tonic Construction

    Walters Residence

    Walters Residence


     
    The “GREENville House”/Walters Residence is composed of two primary design components: bars and panels. Each acts together to generate an environmentally sensitive response. Narrow bars composed of private space branch out into the landscape to create courtyards, capture natural light, allow cross ventilation, and intersect to form a central volume of double height public space. Open to the kitchen and dining and a balcony and loft above, this central volume aligns with compelling views of the landscape. A structural system holding photovoltaic panels and perforated screens is responsible for creating the home’s energy and hot water while shading openings to alleviate unnecessary heat gain. The building’s orientation on the site utilizes the maximum potential of the photovoltaic technology, decreasing the overall load on the geothermal HVAC system. READ MORE & SEE THE GALLERY…

    2013-04-19T19:47:14+00:00April 19th, 2013|0 Comments

    ARQUITECTURA+ACERO: "Art as Shelter"

    (Note: Arquitectura is a Chilean architecture magazine. The content is in Spanish.)

    by F. PfennigerImage

    Ya el título del proyecto (Arte como Refugio) es sugerente. Se trata de un pabellón de uso diverso y múltiple (sala de clases, salón de observación y reflexión, objeto, escultura) dispuesto en un prado asociado al parque de esculturas del Museo de Arte de Carolina del Norte, específicamente en el programa de parques de arte o ‘arte en servicio’. Concebido como un espacio cubierto pero abierto (un refugio) el volumen indaga en tres cuestiones fundamentales: el repliegue y despliegue de los bordes y límites del espacio construido, la transparencia y permeabilidad de dichos bordes y el efecto del entorno sobre el volumen resultante, especialmente de la luz y del aire. Transparencias, sombras, reflejos, brillos se van alternando según las horas y las estaciones destacando la nervadura de la estructura que lo sostiene. READ MORE…

     

    2013-04-10T18:07:11+00:00April 10th, 2013|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Tonic Design's Energy-Efficient Smart-Stell Opens Up To The Outdoors In North Carolina"

    Smart-Stell-House-tonic-design-537x395By Ana Lisa Alperovich
    The Smart-Stell House is an energy-efficient North Carolina home made from standard off-the-shelf materials. Created by Tonic Design, the residence features a discreet facade that opens up in the back to a beautiful park, trees and a private lake.
    Smart-Stell House is a one-story horizontal house that likes to keep its privacy from the outside world featuring a band of clerestory windows on the top. Envisioned as a “home and vacation home” at the same time, it opens up to the back welcoming nature in.

    2013-02-24T18:27:29+00:00February 24th, 2013|0 Comments

    CARAGREEN: "Musician Soars, ECOfusion Floors"

    By Carrie Moorerank
    After winding down a long, pastoral, gravel road in Pittsboro, NC, we arrived at the soaring modern home of musician, Michael Rank. At four floors, it’s the tallest house ever created by Tonic Design, the architect and builder. Its black aluminum and gray cement exterior cut through the country landscape and sky. Ranks’ favorite “colors” – black, gray, and white – canvas the exterior and interior.
    Rank, who just released a new album, “In The Weeds”, with his band, Stag, also just completed construction on his new modern home, and used ECOfusion Color Fusion strand woven bamboo flooring from CaraGreen throughout. The ECOfusion bamboo flooring is a dark gray grounding color, called Morning Mist, with subtle flecks of blue and brown. The effect is created when ECOfusion uses its thru-color technology to dye the bamboo strands using pure plant-based pigments. READ MORE…

    2013-02-22T16:03:01+00:00February 22nd, 2013|0 Comments

    ARCH DAILY: "Smart-Stell Residence / Tonic Design + Tonic Construction"

    50ef1416b3fc4b53ef000027_smart-stell-residence-tonic-design-tonic-construction_smart_3_rear_exterior_day-528x369The clients wanted a new house but not a new neighborhood. On one of their daily walks they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The house, beyond repair, occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a small lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time, they said.
    The design of the new house addresses two key site relationships: (1) the existing neighborhood and its contextual scale, and (2) the landscape of the lake. From the street, the new one-story house’s form is low, quiet, and horizontal, with the only real opening towards the street at the main entrance porch. Because this house would be a dramatic departure from the typical houses in the neighborhood, we sitedit deeplyinto the property. READ MORE…

    2013-01-11T20:46:56+00:00January 11th, 2013|0 Comments

    METALMAG: "Metal Framing and Panels Provide nearly Transparent Shelter"

    By Krista Hovis

    Lowe's Park Pavilion at the NC Museum of Art

    Lowe’s Park Pavilion at the NC Museum of Art


    While many art museums have lawn sculptures to draw visitors in, the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh has taken the concept a step further. Within the museum’s 164-acre (66-hectare) park, the sculptures are more than just works of art; they serve functional purposes, as well. Designed by artists, the pieces are integrated into the infrastructure of the park and serve as seating, footbridges, gateways and, most recently, a shelter.
    As visitors to the park walk along the museum trail, they come upon a stand of trees and a structure in which to rest and look out on a prairie. The 750-square-foot (70-m2) Lowe’s Park Pavilion, made possible in part through a grant from the North Wilkesboro, N.C.-based Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation, is a work of art that provides shelter while blending with the surrounding landscape. Artist and exhibit developer Mike Cindric of Raleigh- based Design Dimension teamed up with Vincent Petrarca, a partner in the Raleigh- based architectural firm Tonic Design, to create an open and inclusive design process to achieve these goals. READ MORE…

    2013-01-08T21:02:24+00:00January 8th, 2013|0 Comments

    AEC CAFE: "Smart-Stell Residence in Durham, USA, by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction"

    a1171ab9By Sanjay Gangal
    The clients wanted a new house but not a new neighborhood. On one of their daily walks they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The house, beyond repair, occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a small lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time, they said.
    The design of the new house addresses two key site relationships: (1) the existing neighborhood and its contextual scale, and (2) the landscape of the lake. From the street, the new one-story house’s form is low, quiet, and horizontal, with the only real opening towards the street at the main entrance porch. Because this house would be a dramatic departure from the typical houses in the neighborhood, we sited it deeply into the property. READ MORE…

    2012-12-18T16:31:21+00:00December 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHITIZER: "Smart-Stell House"

    a1171ab9One of [Tonic Design’s] clients is the founder and director of Triangle Modernist Houses, an award-winning, non-profit organization that documents, preserves and promotes modernist residential design. Naturally, he and his wife wanted a modern house. But they didn’t want to leave their old neighborhood. Then, on one of their daily walks in the neighborhood, they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The indistinct house was beyond repair, but it occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a beautiful lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time,” as they said. READ MORE

    2012-11-30T20:27:42+00:00November 30th, 2012|3 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Crabill House: A Modern & Energy Efficient Forest Shed in North Carolina"

    By Bridgette Meinhold

    The Crabill family bought a 5-acre forested lot in Hillsborough, NC and hired Tonic Design to build them a a simple, modern home that minimized its impact on the environment. They also had to stick to a budget and wanted a unique live/work space that inspired creativity. Tonic’s resulting design drew inspiration from regional agricultural structures and used simple and low maintenance materials to create a striking home that fit the needs of the family. Built for a modest $155 per sq ft, the Crabill House is energy efficient, avoids disturbing the natural environment, and maximizes natural lighting. READ MORE & SEE THE GALLERY…
    2012-11-26T15:03:07+00:00November 26th, 2012|1 Comment

    ARCHINECT: "Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Wins AIA NC's Only Residential Design Award"

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, an award-winning design/build firm in Raleigh, NC, has received a Merit Award from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) for its design and construction of the “Crabill Modern” house in Hillsborough, NC.
    It was the only residential project to win an AIA NC design award this year.
    This simple, modern home is located in a clearing amidst a lush, five-acre forest. The Crabills wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and to accommodate local wildlife. READ MORE…

    2012-11-21T23:22:12+00:00November 21st, 2012|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Chiles Residence: From an Abandoned House to a Light-filled Home for Art Collectors"

    By , 10/31/12
    Renovating an old steel framed house that was abandoned in the 1960s, architects at Tonic Design + Construction have managed to use the bones of the old place to create a beautiful residence for a couple of art collectors. Insisting on keeping the original concept of the house, John and Molly Chiles recognized the potential of the space, seeing open perches and quiet retreats nestled into its steel frame.

    The Chiles Residence is set in a hilly landscape of Raleigh, North Carolina. Overlooking Crabtree Creek, with rotted woodwork and decaying façade, the remains of the old house were transformed into a home that celebrates mid-20th century modern design. READ MORE

    2012-11-01T19:42:34+00:00November 1st, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHDAILY: "Crabill/Tonic Design"

    The Crabills bought the five-acre property near Hillsborough, NC, with the intention of building a simple, modern home in a clearing amidst a lush forest. They wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and accommodate local wildlife.
    “Our clients asked us to design a unique live/work house that inspire creativity and provides interesting spatial overlaps,” said project architect Katherine Hogan, co-owner of Tonic Design and Tonic Construction. “They also wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way”. The architects sited the house carefully to avoid disturbing the natural environment, to maximize natural lighting, and to frame views of forest, including a favorite three-trunked tree. READ MORE

    2012-10-31T17:36:39+00:00October 31st, 2012|0 Comments

    DESIGNBLOOM: "tonic design: crabill modern residence"

     
    american firm tonic design has finished the ‘crabill modern,’ a residence in the middle of a clearing in the surrounding five-acre lush forest property near hillsborough, north carolina. the family wanted a dwelling sensitive to the natural ecosystem, that encouraged creativity and provided a comfortable and interesting space to live. taking cues from the barn shed typology, the contemporary reinterpretation skews the floor plan, with perforated and solid corten panels fulfill the purpose of shading, screening and protecting from the natural elements without the need for further maintenance. READ MORE

    2012-10-25T17:35:12+00:00October 25th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHFLIP: "North Carolina Museum of Art: Sculpture Park Pavilion"

    RALEIGH, UNITED STATES – The addition to the North Carolina Museum of Art’s sculpture park is conceptualized as an outdoor classroom where visitors of the park can appreciate and reflect on their experiences of their museum and museum park visit.
    As an open structure the pavilion is as much a sculpture, as it is a building. It was designed specifically for the location it has been built on and adds a new element of architectural design to the park’s impressive collection of sculptures. Viewed as a building, the pavilion has an accessible area of almost 84sqm (900 square feet). READ MORE

    2012-10-23T16:43:52+00:00October 23rd, 2012|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Rustic GREENville House In North Carolina is Powered by both Solar and Geothermal Energy"

    by , 10/19/12
    Tonic Design has been on the green beat from the start with their contemporary, environmentally friendly home designs. This is particularly true of the GREENville residence located in the North Carolina city with the same name. The home’s striking program is defined by bars and panels, and it is powered by both solar and geothermal energy. It also features a slew of passive design techniques that further reduce its carbon footprint. READ MORE

    2012-10-22T17:31:00+00:00October 22nd, 2012|0 Comments

    CONTEMPORIST: "Chiles Residence by Tonic Design + Construction"

    Tonic Design + Construction provided a contemporary re-design for a mid-century modern house in Raleigh, North Carolina, that was in terrible condition after being abandoned in the 1960s.
    The modern 3500-square-foot house was designed and built for art collectors John and Molly Chiles. It was constructed on the bones of an old modern, steel-framed and wood-paneled house overlooking Crabtree Creek in Raleigh, NC, that was abandoned in the 1960s.The original house was in terrible shape: Its wood walls and floors, camouflaged by kudzu and ivy, had rotted. Yet the “bones” were still strong in concept, and the couple saw through the clutter. They were confidant that the neglected remains could form the basis for a dramatic new house that would pay homage to mid-20th century modern design. READ MORE…

    2012-10-18T22:45:32+00:00October 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCH DAILY: "GREENville House / Tonic Design"

    October 18, 2012
    Architects: Tonic Design
    Location: , North Carolina, United States
    Architect In Charge: Vinny Petrarca
    Photographs: Todd Lanning
    The “GREENville House”/Walters Residence is composed of two primary design components: bars and panels. Each acts together to generate an environmentally sensitive response. Narrow bars composed of private space branch out into the landscape to create courtyards, capture natural light, allow cross ventilation, and intersect to form a central volume of double height public space. READ MORE…

    2012-10-18T13:34:28+00:00October 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Lowe's Pavilion is Transparent Metallic-Skinned Art Shelter at North Carolina's Museum of Art"

    10/3/12
    By Bridgette Meinhold
    Lowe’s Pavilion is both a sculpture and a work of architecture that serves as an outdoor classroom at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Located on the edge of the property at the end of a wooden boardwalk, the ‘art as shelter’ pavilion sits within an open field and takes in the landscape while also working to blend in with it. The project was designed and built by Raleigh-based Tonic Design, who clad the recycled steel structure in a metallic “skin” that lets light and air pass through. READ MORE…

    2012-10-04T14:36:36+00:00October 4th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHDAILY.com: "North Carolina Museum of Art Sculpture Park Pavilion / Tonic Design"

    October 1, 2012

    © Jim West


    The pavilion is an outdoor classroom and component of the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Sculpture Park. The structure is wrapped in varying widths of horizontal, perforated metal bands, which offer experiences that change with the seasons, the light, and the vantage point of the viewer The pavilion’s metallic “skin” reflects its natural surroundings by taking on the colors of the grass and sky or, at times, completely disappearing into a moire pattern of light and shadow.
    The team selected metal, both steel and aluminum, for three primary reasons. Structurally, steel allows the building to resist lateral forces through the use of moment connections, thus avoiding cross bracing and keeping the interior space as visually open as possible, Secondly, the perforated metallic skin, reflective, opaque and transparent, allows breezes to flow through the space while creating a composition of changing light and shadow. Finally, metal is a recycled content material and could one day be recycled and reused. READ MORE…

    2012-10-02T17:34:57+00:00October 2nd, 2012|0 Comments

    AEC CAFE: "Tonic Design's House on Tour, Principals on Panel Discussion"

    September 19, 2012

    Photo by Todd Lanning


    An award-winning modern house designed and built by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction of Raleigh will be featured on the 2012 AIA Triangle Residential Architecture Tour on October 6, and Tonic principals Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan will participate in an associated panel discussion in Chapel Hill on September 25.
    Tonic’s Crabill Modern house (right) is one of only six residences selected for the Triangle Tour of Residential Architecture, featuring award-winning, architect-designed homes throughout the Triangle.  Each residence received an AIA Triangle honor award for design excellence. An independent jury, chaired by Roberto De Leon of the Louisville-based firm De Leon and Primmer Architecture Workshop, selected the six houses from all others submitted for inclusion. READ MORE…

    2012-09-20T14:26:50+00:00September 20th, 2012|0 Comments

    HOMEDSGN.com: "Crabill Modern by Tonic Design"

    9/14/12
    Raleigh-based studio Tonic Design has completed the Crabill Modern project, a two story contemporary home located in Hillsborough, North Carolina, USA.
    The Crabills bought the five-acre property near Hillsborough, NC, with the intention of building a simple, modern home in a clearing amidst a lush forest. They wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and accommodate local wildlife.
    “Our clients asked us to design a unique live/work house that inspires creativity and provide interesting spatial overlaps,” said project architect Katherine Hogan, co-owner of Tonic Design and Tonic Construction. “They also wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way.” SEE THE GALLERY & READ MORE…

    2012-09-14T15:24:55+00:00September 14th, 2012|0 Comments

    WORLD ARCHITECTURE NEWS: "Walters' House lands jury award"

    A house designed by architect Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh received one of only three coveted Jury Awards during the inaugural George Matsumoto Prize for modernist residential design, sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses.
    Tonic’s “GREENville House,” the firm’s name for the home of Bobby and Kristi Walters of Greenville, NC, placed third in the competition, which was open to architects anywhere in the world as long as the house submitted was located in North Carolina. An Energy Star house, the Walters’ home was the first modern residence in the state to achieve LEED Silver accreditation. READ MORE…
     

    2012-08-18T14:32:51+00:00August 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    AEC CAFE.com: "Tonic Design Wins Matsumoto Prize for Modernist Residential Architecture"

    August 15, 2012
    A house designed by architect Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh received one of only three coveted Jury Awards during the inaugural George Matsumoto Prize for modernist residential design, sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses.
    Tonic’s “GREENville House,” the firm’s name for the home of Bobby and Kristi Walters of Greenville, NC, placed third in the competition, which was open to architects anywhere in the world as long as the house submitted was located in North Carolina. READ MORE…

    2012-08-16T18:45:25+00:00August 16th, 2012|0 Comments

    DESIGN & BUILD WITH METAL: "Architectural Zinc in Residential Applications: Why More Homes Will Include Zinc as a Duraable, Green Building Material"

    June 2012Image
    …In Greenville, North Carolina, the Walters Residence, a sleek, modern residence designed by Tonic Design + Build, is an excellent example of the use of architectural zinc in an eco-friendly, energy-saving home. Both the clients and the design team envisioned the house as a model of environmental sensitivity and materials selection was critical to their success. To that end, designer Vincent Petrarca, Associate AIA, specified 1500 square feet of VMZINC flat lock panel for the home’s double-height “public” space.
    “The color, material qualities, and the system of interlocking panels created a detailed texture of surface and shadow on the exterior facade of the two-story public space of the house,” said Petrarca. “In order to meet the goals of the a LEED for Homes Silver project, we selected zinc as a key feature in the exterior composition of materials. Not only is it 100 percent recyclable, but it’s also durable and low maintenance with a lifespan of nearly 100 years. This was very appealing to the clients.” READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

    2012-06-14T23:55:18+00:00June 14th, 2012|0 Comments

    RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "Value of Residential Architecture – Video Series"

    Screen shot from the video.


    Residential Architect magazine introduces a new video series that explores the importance of residential design and the value architects bring to the housing industry. Throughout the year, we’ll talk with residential architects passionate about their profession, among them Will Bruder, AIA, Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, Ted Flato, FAIA, Elizabeth Gray, FAIA, and Alan Organschi, Dan Shipley, FAIA, Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, Assoc. AIA, and John Carney, FAIA. Please join us for the entire series and find out how the spaces we occupy in our everyday lives shape us as human beings and as a society.
    CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE TONIC VIDEO

    2012-06-05T20:53:28+00:00June 5th, 2012|0 Comments

    INFORM: "Clearly _ Here: Raleigh, NC"

    Audio Buy redux


    The 2012 Inform Awards jury recognized this project by Tonic Design for its object design excellence.
    For the first 14 years of its life, what is now the Audio Buys Building stood as a symbol of the future in downtown Raleigh. The sleek Modern building, originally built in the mid-’60s, housed one of the most progressive drycleaners in the country. Displayed in the mostly glass façade was a collection of mechanized machinery designed to transport, clean, and press garments in North Carolina’s capital…READ MORE…

    2012-05-21T19:16:46+00:00May 21st, 2012|0 Comments

    DWELL: "Region of Honor"

    The Crabill House


    Tuned into its sylvan setting, this affordable green home in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is a modern take on the surrounding centuries-old structures.
    By Diana Budds
    Historic barns dot the countryside around Hillsborough, a region that traces its agricultural roots to the 1750s. So when John and Stacy Crabill contacted Tonic to design their new home, the firm gleaned inspiration from the local typology while taking things in a decidedly modern direction.
    “They really trusted us to do something different,” says Tonic’s architectural designer, Katherine Hogan. READ MORE…

    2012-03-12T19:07:27+00:00March 12th, 2012|0 Comments

    METAL ARCHITECTURE: "2011 Chairman’s Awards"

    11/1/2011
    The Metal Construction Association recognized its 2011 Chairman’s Award recipients at METALCON International. Previously named the MCA President’s Awards, the Chairman’s Awards are an annual designation given to outstanding building projects involving MCA member companies. The awards honor innovation and creativity while showcasing how metal products help achieve exceptional building designs…
    …Residential

    Greenville Residence


    Greenville House, Greenville, NC
    The clients and design team envisioned this private residence as a model of environmental sensitivity. Material selection for the exterior was critical to the project success. Zinc was used on the double height volume of the residence as a key element of the composition of exterior materials. The project team wanted to use materials that would make a statement about sustainability. Raleigh, N.C.-based Umicore Building Products USA Inc. supplied 1,500 square feet of VMZINC flat lock panel, which were selected because of its lower embodied energy than other metals and it is a naturally occurring element. It is now a LEED for Homes Silver certified and Energy Star-rated home.
    For this project, the MCA judges applauded the choice to use zinc, given the sustainable characteristics the builder was going for. The palette of wood was a nice counterpoint to the other materials used and the use of metal panels was ideal to creating the focal point of the home.
    The architect and contractor for this project is Raleigh-based Tonic Design/Tonic Construction and the metal installer is Metalworx Inc., Summerville, S.C. READ MORE…

    2011-11-01T18:56:44+00:00November 1st, 2011|0 Comments

    CUSTOM HOME: "GREENville House, Greenville, N.C. Custom Home / 3,000 to 5,000 Square Feet"

    May-June 2011

    GREENvilleHOUSE


    By Bruce D. Snider
    The owners of this new LEED Silver-rated residence did their sustainability homework in advance. “They knew about solar and geothermal from the beginning,” says project designer Katherine Hogan. That head start allowed Hogan and principal designer Vincent Petrarca to weave green features into the fabric of the building, rather than tack them on as options after the fact. READ MORE…

    2011-06-15T19:04:04+00:00June 15th, 2011|0 Comments

    DESIGNBOOM: "tonic design: art as shelter"


    ‘art as shelter’ by raleigh based tonic design is a pavilion constructed on the sculpture park
    of the north carolina museum of art. designed and built as an integral part of the museum’s
    ‘art-in-service’ project, the structure provides a space to sit and reflect on the surrounding
    wooded site… READ MORE…

    2011-06-06T00:39:39+00:00June 6th, 2011|0 Comments

    RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "leading light – a new family home sets an example for its community".

    May-June 2011

    The GREENville House


    by Bruce D. Snider
    The design/build architects of Raleigh, N.C.–based Tonic Design are big on the synergies afforded by their way of producing buildings. Interweaving design and construction creates opportunities for improvisation, says principal designer Vincent Petrarca. “It’s like jazz.” The LEED for Homes–certified GREENville House in Greenville, N.C., demonstrates the power of such synergies, not only between design and construction, but also between modernism and sustainability.
    The owners envisioned the house as an alternative model for their architecturally conservative community, Petrarca says. They favored modernist design, “and they had researched solar and geothermal from the beginning.” READ MORE…

    2011-05-15T18:16:43+00:00May 15th, 2011|0 Comments

    "Mind The Garden" — an award-winning possibility in Charleston

    MindTheGardenCompositposted by Kim Weiss, Blueplate PR

    Downtown Charleston isn’t exactly known for cutting-edge architecture,” wrote Robert Behre of the Charleston Post & Courier in November of 2010. “[This exhibition] provides a glimpse of what the city’s been missing out on.”

    The exhibition he referenced was the result of an imaginary exercise called “The HuB Design Competition.” Sponsored by the Charleston chapter of Architecture For Humanity, the competition challenged designers to create a new 50,000-square-foot transit hub, to be built on the surface parking lot at Meeting and John streets next to the Charleston Visitor Center, with offices, retail, meeting, and green spaces and the ability to serve light rail, tourists, bus riders, and cyclists.

    Sixty-six entries from six continents came in, and the winner was:

    “Mind the Garden” by David Hill and Laura Garofalo of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh, NC. The prize: $1250.

    The winning entry, from Tonic Design of Raleigh…would aim to create a vibrant city space not by making a monumental building — like most train stations of the past — but an urban garden that commuters and city dwellers could use,” wrote Behre when he announced the winners.

    “Mind the Garden” is a vessel and stage that would sustain and enrich local culture. The bar building’s bays, at the ground level, would create market (retail) stalls for regional goods, such as Gullah baskets and farmers’ produce.

    The designers took some of their cues from the historic Charleston Single Houses that offer compelling models for environmental sustainability, but their enclosed gardens privatize green space and do little to encourage public encounters. The “Mind the Garden” scheme would break down the garden-wall barriers to make pleasant, welcoming green space and provide a threshold to introduce local culture to Charleston’s visitors. Small pavilions for waiting, cafes, ticketing, and vending would occupy and invigorate the garden platform.

    The green space functions simultaneously as a pathway, a place of rest, and a surface for activity, while making connections beyond the site, coupling axially with Wragg Square to the north and east.

    The winning entries were displayed in the windows of the former Millennium Music store in downtown Charleston.

    The competition may have been imaginary, but as Steve Ramos, an architect with LS3P and Architecture for Humanity chapter leader, told Behre, “We want people in Charleston to see this stuff – and think about it.”

    Architecture for Humanity is a nonprofit that searches for design solutions to humanitarian crises and that provides free design services to worthy causes. For more information, visit https://architectureforhumanity.org/

     

     

     

    2011-01-06T15:49:01+00:00January 6th, 2011|0 Comments

    NEWS & OBSERVER: "A core of simplicity"

    Interior, the GREENville House


    By Laura Battaglia
    Bobby Walters had always been drawn to the simplicity and clean lines of modern architecture. But a modern aesthetic was not his only requirement as he planned a house for himself and his wife. Walters was also interested in sustainable features and cost-conscious decisions. In essence, he wanted to build a better house.
    A radiologist by profession, Walters relates his sense of design and attention to detail to his work analyzing radiology images. He worked with Tonic Design on scheme after scheme; a process that his wife, Kristi, called a “five-year affair.” As the design developed, the team realized that their design was inherently “green.” The overriding concept of the Greenville residence is a series of wings that extend from a central core living area into the landscape in a pinwheel fashion. This allows for visual connections, breezes and natural daylight – all features of a design engaged with its environment… READ MORE…
    2010-06-26T20:21:56+00:00June 26th, 2010|0 Comments

    Triangle Business Journal: 2010 "40 Under 40 Leadership Awards"

    today’s young leaders & CEOs on the move

    The 10th annual 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards ceremony is one of the most eagerly anticipated events of the year within the Triangle’s business community… They have:

    • attained significant leadership roles in their organizations
    • achieved a significant career milestone in 2009
    • had substantial involvement in community service

    Winners Announced…

    …Vincent Petrarca, Owner, Tonic Design and Tonic Construction

    Vincent Petrarca is a graduate of the N.C. State School of Design.
    Age: 37.

    Description of employer: Architectural firm and construction company – design and build of modern architectural residences and commercial properties.
    Hometown: Raleigh.  READ MORE…

    2010-05-24T22:13:24+00:00May 24th, 2010|0 Comments

    METRO MAGAZINE: "Design Excellence and Constant Advocacy"

    May 2010
    By Diane Lea
    …The last Built project for the [AIA Triangle] Merit Awards is the GREENville House by Tonic Design of Raleigh. This project also honors Lindsey. Constructed in Greenville for owners Bobby and Kristi Walters, the consultants include Richard Kaydos-Daniels of Raleigh, Southern Energy Management of Morrisville, and the NCSU North Carolina Solar Center. Tonic’s Vincent Petrarca describes the house, characterized by individual bars, as “being built to track the sun as it stretches away from its own shadow.” The roof utilizes thermoplastic membrane and a system of solar thermal and photovoltaic panels… READ MORE…

    2010-05-20T18:38:29+00:00May 20th, 2010|0 Comments

    NEW RALEIGH: "Tonic Design GREENville House Featured in Architectural Record"

    April 16, 2010

    Detail of the GREENville House


    Young and hip, Raleigh architecture/design-build firm Tonic Design is no stranger to the pages of New Raleigh. From their multiple AIA-NC Awards, to local home tours, to bus designs, to finishing high on the Moore Square design competition, the crew over at Tonic are definitely creating some of the more cutting edge architecture in the region, if not a broader area.
    As well as making waves in local design circles, over the years Tonic has also been published in a few national publications, with more sure to follow in the coming years. The most recent is a write-up in one of the largest trade magazines in the architecture industry, Architectural Record. The article focuses on the client/architecture relationship around their newest house (Walters’ Residence) in Greenville, North Carolina. The 4,700-square foot project “is expected to be rated LEED Silver in the next few months” and “has the performance of one half its size.” READ MORE…

    2010-04-16T18:45:48+00:00April 16th, 2010|0 Comments

    INFORM: "Design Between The Lines"

    The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer

    The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer


    By Georgia Bizios, FAIA, and Katie Wakeford
    Bobby and Kristi Walters hired Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, sibling businesses based in Raleigh, North Carolina to help them create what would ultimately be a 4,000 square-foot home for a growing family on a three acre site.  It’s a contemporary home that exceeds their aspirations thanks to green strategies and smart process.
    Projcted to receive LEED Silver Certification from the USGBC, the Tonic team pursued energy-efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, durability, and occupant health and comfort. Features include geothermal heating and cooling, rainwater collection in an underground cistern for irrigation, solar hot water with a tankless backup system, and low maintenance, highly durable materials such as zinc and cedar siding. READ MORE…

    2010-04-12T16:10:19+00:00April 12th, 2010|0 Comments

    ARCHITECTURAL RECORD: "Walters' Residence, Greenville, North Carolina"

    April 2010

    The Walters’ Residence


    By Ingrid Spencer
    For Bobby and Kristi Walters a lot has changed over the five years since they approached Vinny Petrarca, Assoc. AIA, to design their house in Greenville, North Carolina. They’ve gotten married, Bobby made partner in his medical practice, they’re expecting their first child, and they’ve moved into the home designed and built by Petrarca’s firms Tonic Design and Tonic Construction. A lot too, occurred with the process of designing and building the house, including at least one rejection from local authorities for permits to build this Modern house. “It didn’t matter that the design integrated sustainability and new technology,” says Petrarca. “They just turned it down.”
    Petrarca was as happy as the Walters when they found an alternative three-acre plot in a newly developed coastal plain area of Greenville where the design was met with encouragement rather than objections. At just over 4,700-square feet, it’s not a small project, but Petrarca and project manager Robby Johnston argue that the house—which is expected to be rated LEED Silver in the next few months has the performance of one  half its size… READ MORE…

    2010-04-05T18:04:11+00:00April 5th, 2010|0 Comments

    NEWS & OBSERVER: "Simplicity from Complexity"

    By Adam Brakenbury

    Inside the Lanning residence

    Jodie and Todd Lanning had lived in the Lochmere neighborhood for several years and had come to consider the area their home. Their ranch-style house was near work, good schools and church, and they enjoyed the walking trails and wooded landscape. So when they decided to build a new home for their growing family, they knew they wanted to stay in the neighborhood.
    Todd Lanning, a graphic designer, had visited a house by the design/build firm Tonic Design while it was under construction and decided on the spot that he wanted a home with a similar Modern style, open plan and natural light.
    The Lannings first looked at existing houses in the neighborhood, thinking they might find something to renovate. However, nothing that was available at the time seemed as if it would accommodate the transformation they envisioned. Then they discovered a plot of land that was vacant and began talking with Vincent Petrarca, a family member and one of the partners of Tonic Design, about designing a new home for them. READ MORE…

    2009-10-24T20:28:57+00:00October 24th, 2009|0 Comments

    RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "tonic design offers feasibility service to clients"

    By Stephani Miller
    Raleigh, N.C.-based design/build firm Tonic Design | Tonic Construction has developed a flat-fee service for its clients to help them understand the process and realities of building a home before they commit to moving forward with construction. The service, dubbed Tonic Express, helps clients determine the scope and financial feasibility of their home building project, for a fee of $3,000.
    “Our goal is to get more people to use architects and not spend their cash out-of-pocket until they [secure] a loan with a bank,” says Vincent Petrarca, partner and general contractor at Tonic. “Ninety-eight percent of the public doesn’t use architects—I think it’s just because it’s so costly. What we did was streamline the process, so that people can have more options for using architects.” READ MORE…

    2009-09-01T19:57:19+00:00September 1st, 2009|0 Comments

    CUSTOM HOME: "Vincent Petrarca, Tonic Design-Tonic Construction, Raleigh, N.C."

    Weather Shield Windows & Doors
    AyA Kitchens and Baths. 866.292.4968. www.ayakitchens.com.
    Weather Shield Windows & Doors. 800.538.8836. www.weathershield.com.


    By Shelley D. Hutchins
    As founder and principal architect of a design/build company, Vince Petrarca depends on high-quality products that he can provide for clients at a fair price. Thanks to smart shopping, he was able to design and build a house for his sister for just $150 a square foot. Petrarca likes AyA cabinets for their budget-friendly cost, variety of style options, and durability. For his sister’s house, he selected the flat-panel Manhattan door in natural maple. The cost of the cabinets includes installation, and that really helps Petrarca’s bottom line. “Everything is well-made from shelves to hardware,” he says.
    READ MORE…

    2008-09-28T19:23:22+00:00September 28th, 2008|0 Comments

    NEWS & OBSERVER: "Modern Resurrection"

    Chiles residence


    By David Hill, guest columnist

    John and Molly Chiles decided to build a new modern house in North Carolina, and they found just the place for it on the resurrected bones of an old modern house.
    The Ohio couple explored the more traditional option of buying a home site and building from the ground up, but they soon became fascinated with the possibility of renovating an abandoned 1960s steel frame and wood panel house overlooking Crabtree Creek in Raleigh.
    Renovation does not sufficiently describe the task that lay ahead for the Chileses and Tonic Design/Construction, a local design-build firm. The house’s wood walls and floors had rotted, and it was camouflaged by a tangle of kudzu and ivy.
    Vincent Petrarca of Tonic admits that the house was in terrible shape, but “still strong in concept” and full of possibilities… READ MORE…
    2007-09-29T20:15:33+00:00September 29th, 2007|0 Comments

    CUSTOM HOME: "Frame of Reference – A North Carolina Modernist house gets a new skin on its bones."

    July/August 2007

    Chiles house, Raleigh, NC. (Photo by Jim West)


    By Bruce D. Snider
    Time marches on. But in custom building, it doesn’t always march in a straight line. Take this house. Only 40 years old and fast headed for an early grave, it was rescued by a team of builder/architects who had not yet been born when it was new. These young craftspeople, some of them fresh out of architecture school, rebuilt it in a style that is older than their grandparents. Which, of course, we call Modernism. In spite of the looping path, however, the building arrives at the present day in very fine form. The bones of its once deteriorating structure support a house that is visually stimulating, great fun to live in, and—this time—built to last.
    Vinnie Petrarca, 34, and his crew at Tonic Design had been watching the house for a while, hoping to get their hands on it before it got scraped off. Modernists by training and inclination, they liked its flat-roofed form, its exposed steel structure, and the way it seemed to float in the treetops of its steep, wooded site. The odds of finding a patron who shared their enthusiasm, though, did not look good. The house sat on a desirable lot that could be subdivided to carry two new houses. Worse, the building itself was in a miserable state. The steel frame and concrete floor decks were intact, but the rest was rapidly heading south. “It was a melting wood structure, just falling apart,” Petrarca says. When he showed the place to an Ohio couple planning to retire here in Raleigh, N.C., curb appeal was in notably short supply. “It was a rainy day in January,” Petrarca remembers, “and there were tarps all over the house.” Still, he pleaded its case. Despite appearances, he maintained, the house was still “strong in concept.” The couple left unconvinced. READ MORE…

    2007-07-05T19:21:39+00:00July 5th, 2007|0 Comments

    RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "K + B Studio / Kitchen – hover craft"

    Three young architects with a passion for craftsmanship launched their new design/build firm and this 6,000-square-foot interiors project nearly simultaneously. “Most of these modern designs require learning as you go when building them, anyway,” says principal Vincent Petrarca, Associate AIA. “We knew we could build our designs as well as a more experienced contractor because it’s all new with each house, and we see the whole picture and can anticipate how things need to be exactly.”
    The soaring story-and-a-half kitchen condenses functions so the room can remain open to outdoor views. Geared to a serious cook, the work zone circulates around a large double-sided island, containing a cook-top and stainless steel surround, and a concrete eating bar…
    READ MORE…

    2005-06-17T20:01:46+00:00June 17th, 2005|0 Comments