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METAL ARCHITECTURE: "2011 Chairman’s Awards"

11/1/2011
The Metal Construction Association recognized its 2011 Chairman’s Award recipients at METALCON International. Previously named the MCA President’s Awards, the Chairman’s Awards are an annual designation given to outstanding building projects involving MCA member companies. The awards honor innovation and creativity while showcasing how metal products help achieve exceptional building designs…
…Residential

Greenville Residence


Greenville House, Greenville, NC
The clients and design team envisioned this private residence as a model of environmental sensitivity. Material selection for the exterior was critical to the project success. Zinc was used on the double height volume of the residence as a key element of the composition of exterior materials. The project team wanted to use materials that would make a statement about sustainability. Raleigh, N.C.-based Umicore Building Products USA Inc. supplied 1,500 square feet of VMZINC flat lock panel, which were selected because of its lower embodied energy than other metals and it is a naturally occurring element. It is now a LEED for Homes Silver certified and Energy Star-rated home.
For this project, the MCA judges applauded the choice to use zinc, given the sustainable characteristics the builder was going for. The palette of wood was a nice counterpoint to the other materials used and the use of metal panels was ideal to creating the focal point of the home.
The architect and contractor for this project is Raleigh-based Tonic Design/Tonic Construction and the metal installer is Metalworx Inc., Summerville, S.C. READ MORE…

2011-11-01T18:56:44+00:00November 1st, 2011|0 Comments

CUSTOM HOME: "GREENville House, Greenville, N.C. Custom Home / 3,000 to 5,000 Square Feet"

May-June 2011

GREENvilleHOUSE


By Bruce D. Snider
The owners of this new LEED Silver-rated residence did their sustainability homework in advance. “They knew about solar and geothermal from the beginning,” says project designer Katherine Hogan. That head start allowed Hogan and principal designer Vincent Petrarca to weave green features into the fabric of the building, rather than tack them on as options after the fact. READ MORE…

2011-06-15T19:04:04+00:00June 15th, 2011|0 Comments

DESIGNBOOM: "tonic design: art as shelter"


‘art as shelter’ by raleigh based tonic design is a pavilion constructed on the sculpture park
of the north carolina museum of art. designed and built as an integral part of the museum’s
‘art-in-service’ project, the structure provides a space to sit and reflect on the surrounding
wooded site… READ MORE…

2011-06-06T00:39:39+00:00June 6th, 2011|0 Comments

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "leading light – a new family home sets an example for its community".

May-June 2011

The GREENville House


by Bruce D. Snider
The design/build architects of Raleigh, N.C.–based Tonic Design are big on the synergies afforded by their way of producing buildings. Interweaving design and construction creates opportunities for improvisation, says principal designer Vincent Petrarca. “It’s like jazz.” The LEED for Homes–certified GREENville House in Greenville, N.C., demonstrates the power of such synergies, not only between design and construction, but also between modernism and sustainability.
The owners envisioned the house as an alternative model for their architecturally conservative community, Petrarca says. They favored modernist design, “and they had researched solar and geothermal from the beginning.” READ MORE…

2011-05-15T18:16:43+00:00May 15th, 2011|0 Comments

"Mind The Garden" — an award-winning possibility in Charleston

MindTheGardenCompositposted by Kim Weiss, Blueplate PR

Downtown Charleston isn’t exactly known for cutting-edge architecture,” wrote Robert Behre of the Charleston Post & Courier in November of 2010. “[This exhibition] provides a glimpse of what the city’s been missing out on.”

The exhibition he referenced was the result of an imaginary exercise called “The HuB Design Competition.” Sponsored by the Charleston chapter of Architecture For Humanity, the competition challenged designers to create a new 50,000-square-foot transit hub, to be built on the surface parking lot at Meeting and John streets next to the Charleston Visitor Center, with offices, retail, meeting, and green spaces and the ability to serve light rail, tourists, bus riders, and cyclists.

Sixty-six entries from six continents came in, and the winner was:

“Mind the Garden” by David Hill and Laura Garofalo of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh, NC. The prize: $1250.

The winning entry, from Tonic Design of Raleigh…would aim to create a vibrant city space not by making a monumental building — like most train stations of the past — but an urban garden that commuters and city dwellers could use,” wrote Behre when he announced the winners.

“Mind the Garden” is a vessel and stage that would sustain and enrich local culture. The bar building’s bays, at the ground level, would create market (retail) stalls for regional goods, such as Gullah baskets and farmers’ produce.

The designers took some of their cues from the historic Charleston Single Houses that offer compelling models for environmental sustainability, but their enclosed gardens privatize green space and do little to encourage public encounters. The “Mind the Garden” scheme would break down the garden-wall barriers to make pleasant, welcoming green space and provide a threshold to introduce local culture to Charleston’s visitors. Small pavilions for waiting, cafes, ticketing, and vending would occupy and invigorate the garden platform.

The green space functions simultaneously as a pathway, a place of rest, and a surface for activity, while making connections beyond the site, coupling axially with Wragg Square to the north and east.

The winning entries were displayed in the windows of the former Millennium Music store in downtown Charleston.

The competition may have been imaginary, but as Steve Ramos, an architect with LS3P and Architecture for Humanity chapter leader, told Behre, “We want people in Charleston to see this stuff – and think about it.”

Architecture for Humanity is a nonprofit that searches for design solutions to humanitarian crises and that provides free design services to worthy causes. For more information, visit https://architectureforhumanity.org/

 

 

 

2011-01-06T15:49:01+00:00January 6th, 2011|0 Comments

Raleigh's Tonic Design + Construction with Mike Cindric Receive 2010 AIA Small Project Award

July 2, 2010 (RALEIGH, NC) – Tonic Design | Tonic Construction with Mike Cindric are recipients of  a 2010 AIA Small Project Award for their Art As Shelter project.
Cited by the SPP jury as “a remarkable piece of shelter and a handsome form in the landscape,“ this project was designed and built as an integral component of the North Carolina Museum of Art Park’s “art-in-service” projects program. ‘Art as Shelter’ offers visitors a sheltered place to sit and reflect upon the museum sculpture park and public greenway. The pavilion can be viewed as an object in the landscape or experienced from within, framing views of the sculptures, trail and the adjacent prairie.
Large interior clear spans promote the use as an open-air classroom, a beautiful indoor/outdoor setting for teaching about art and nature. Docent-led student groups utilize the space as a studio; where folding tables, folding stools, and art-making materials are stored in frosted-acrylic clad boxes that double as benches and night time illumination. The metallic “skin” of the pavilion reflects its natural surroundings by taking on the colors of the grass and sky, or at times completely disappearing into a moiré pattern of light and shadow.
Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, a design/build firm, has won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state, regional, and national levels, and has been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, Custom Home, and  Architectural Record magazines.  “Art as Shelter” has been featured in MetalMag Architecture and has been a winner of an AIA award of merit and a Sir Walter Raleigh Award. For more information visit  http://www.tonic-design.com.

2010-07-02T00:26:42+00:00July 2nd, 2010|1 Comment

NEWS & OBSERVER: "A core of simplicity"

Interior, the GREENville House


By Laura Battaglia
Bobby Walters had always been drawn to the simplicity and clean lines of modern architecture. But a modern aesthetic was not his only requirement as he planned a house for himself and his wife. Walters was also interested in sustainable features and cost-conscious decisions. In essence, he wanted to build a better house.
A radiologist by profession, Walters relates his sense of design and attention to detail to his work analyzing radiology images. He worked with Tonic Design on scheme after scheme; a process that his wife, Kristi, called a “five-year affair.” As the design developed, the team realized that their design was inherently “green.” The overriding concept of the Greenville residence is a series of wings that extend from a central core living area into the landscape in a pinwheel fashion. This allows for visual connections, breezes and natural daylight – all features of a design engaged with its environment… READ MORE…
2010-06-26T20:21:56+00:00June 26th, 2010|0 Comments

Raleigh's Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Receives USGBC LEED for Homes Silver Rating

The GREENville House


June 15, 2010 (GREENVILLE, NC) – The GREENville HOUSE designed and built by Tonic Design and Tonic Construction was awarded LEED Silver certification by the USGBC for achievement in green homebuilding and design.
LEED for Homes is a green home certification program that rewards homes that are designed and built to be energy- and resource-efficient and more healthy and durable for the occupants. LEED-certified homes complete a technically rigorous process that often includes a home energy (HERS) rating and onsite inspections to verify that the home is built to be energy and water efficient, environmentally sound, and a healthier place to live.
Driven by technologically advanced systems, sensitive building placement and site orientation, the house tracks the sun as it stretches away from its own shadow.  Private spaces fill narrow bars, extending into the landscape and away from a double height, public volume created to satisfy the requests of the clients’ young and expanding family. These bands of rooms allow natural light to be captured, easy cross ventilation and maximized solar access. Photovoltaic panels and perforated aluminum screens work in concert to provide shading and generate energy to each of these bars.
Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state, regional and national levels and has been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, Custom Home, and Architectural Record magazines. The GREENville HOUSE has been featured in Architectural Record and Inform Magazine and is the winner of a 2010 AIA Triangle award and a Gail Lindsey Sustainibility Award. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.
About LEED for Homes
LEED for Homes is a third-party certification system for building and designing high-performance green homes that are energy-and-resource-efficient and healthy for its occupants.  Developed and administered by USGBC, LEED for Homes awards points to projects in eight categories of environmental performance: Innovation & Design Process, Location & Linkages, Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Indoor Environmental Quality, Energy & Atmosphere, Materials & Resources, and Awareness & Education. To date, more than 5,000 homes have achieved certification with LEED for Homes program, and over 20,000 have registered and are in process.

2010-06-15T00:20:27+00:00June 15th, 2010|0 Comments

Triangle Business Journal: 2010 "40 Under 40 Leadership Awards"

today’s young leaders & CEOs on the move

The 10th annual 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards ceremony is one of the most eagerly anticipated events of the year within the Triangle’s business community… They have:

  • attained significant leadership roles in their organizations
  • achieved a significant career milestone in 2009
  • had substantial involvement in community service

Winners Announced…

…Vincent Petrarca, Owner, Tonic Design and Tonic Construction

Vincent Petrarca is a graduate of the N.C. State School of Design.
Age: 37.

Description of employer: Architectural firm and construction company – design and build of modern architectural residences and commercial properties.
Hometown: Raleigh.  READ MORE…

2010-05-24T22:13:24+00:00May 24th, 2010|0 Comments

METRO MAGAZINE: "Design Excellence and Constant Advocacy"

May 2010
By Diane Lea
…The last Built project for the [AIA Triangle] Merit Awards is the GREENville House by Tonic Design of Raleigh. This project also honors Lindsey. Constructed in Greenville for owners Bobby and Kristi Walters, the consultants include Richard Kaydos-Daniels of Raleigh, Southern Energy Management of Morrisville, and the NCSU North Carolina Solar Center. Tonic’s Vincent Petrarca describes the house, characterized by individual bars, as “being built to track the sun as it stretches away from its own shadow.” The roof utilizes thermoplastic membrane and a system of solar thermal and photovoltaic panels… READ MORE…

2010-05-20T18:38:29+00:00May 20th, 2010|0 Comments

NEW RALEIGH: "Tonic Design GREENville House Featured in Architectural Record"

April 16, 2010

Detail of the GREENville House


Young and hip, Raleigh architecture/design-build firm Tonic Design is no stranger to the pages of New Raleigh. From their multiple AIA-NC Awards, to local home tours, to bus designs, to finishing high on the Moore Square design competition, the crew over at Tonic are definitely creating some of the more cutting edge architecture in the region, if not a broader area.
As well as making waves in local design circles, over the years Tonic has also been published in a few national publications, with more sure to follow in the coming years. The most recent is a write-up in one of the largest trade magazines in the architecture industry, Architectural Record. The article focuses on the client/architecture relationship around their newest house (Walters’ Residence) in Greenville, North Carolina. The 4,700-square foot project “is expected to be rated LEED Silver in the next few months” and “has the performance of one half its size.” READ MORE…

2010-04-16T18:45:48+00:00April 16th, 2010|0 Comments

INFORM: "Design Between The Lines"

The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer

The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer


By Georgia Bizios, FAIA, and Katie Wakeford
Bobby and Kristi Walters hired Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, sibling businesses based in Raleigh, North Carolina to help them create what would ultimately be a 4,000 square-foot home for a growing family on a three acre site.  It’s a contemporary home that exceeds their aspirations thanks to green strategies and smart process.
Projcted to receive LEED Silver Certification from the USGBC, the Tonic team pursued energy-efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, durability, and occupant health and comfort. Features include geothermal heating and cooling, rainwater collection in an underground cistern for irrigation, solar hot water with a tankless backup system, and low maintenance, highly durable materials such as zinc and cedar siding. READ MORE…

2010-04-12T16:10:19+00:00April 12th, 2010|0 Comments

ARCHITECTURAL RECORD: "Walters' Residence, Greenville, North Carolina"

April 2010

The Walters’ Residence


By Ingrid Spencer
For Bobby and Kristi Walters a lot has changed over the five years since they approached Vinny Petrarca, Assoc. AIA, to design their house in Greenville, North Carolina. They’ve gotten married, Bobby made partner in his medical practice, they’re expecting their first child, and they’ve moved into the home designed and built by Petrarca’s firms Tonic Design and Tonic Construction. A lot too, occurred with the process of designing and building the house, including at least one rejection from local authorities for permits to build this Modern house. “It didn’t matter that the design integrated sustainability and new technology,” says Petrarca. “They just turned it down.”
Petrarca was as happy as the Walters when they found an alternative three-acre plot in a newly developed coastal plain area of Greenville where the design was met with encouragement rather than objections. At just over 4,700-square feet, it’s not a small project, but Petrarca and project manager Robby Johnston argue that the house—which is expected to be rated LEED Silver in the next few months has the performance of one  half its size… READ MORE…

2010-04-05T18:04:11+00:00April 5th, 2010|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "Simplicity from Complexity"

By Adam Brakenbury

Inside the Lanning residence

Jodie and Todd Lanning had lived in the Lochmere neighborhood for several years and had come to consider the area their home. Their ranch-style house was near work, good schools and church, and they enjoyed the walking trails and wooded landscape. So when they decided to build a new home for their growing family, they knew they wanted to stay in the neighborhood.
Todd Lanning, a graphic designer, had visited a house by the design/build firm Tonic Design while it was under construction and decided on the spot that he wanted a home with a similar Modern style, open plan and natural light.
The Lannings first looked at existing houses in the neighborhood, thinking they might find something to renovate. However, nothing that was available at the time seemed as if it would accommodate the transformation they envisioned. Then they discovered a plot of land that was vacant and began talking with Vincent Petrarca, a family member and one of the partners of Tonic Design, about designing a new home for them. READ MORE…

2009-10-24T20:28:57+00:00October 24th, 2009|0 Comments

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "tonic design offers feasibility service to clients"

By Stephani Miller
Raleigh, N.C.-based design/build firm Tonic Design | Tonic Construction has developed a flat-fee service for its clients to help them understand the process and realities of building a home before they commit to moving forward with construction. The service, dubbed Tonic Express, helps clients determine the scope and financial feasibility of their home building project, for a fee of $3,000.
“Our goal is to get more people to use architects and not spend their cash out-of-pocket until they [secure] a loan with a bank,” says Vincent Petrarca, partner and general contractor at Tonic. “Ninety-eight percent of the public doesn’t use architects—I think it’s just because it’s so costly. What we did was streamline the process, so that people can have more options for using architects.” READ MORE…

2009-09-01T19:57:19+00:00September 1st, 2009|0 Comments

Raleigh’s Tonic Design | Tonic Construction with Mike Cindric are recipients of an Award of Merit from the Inform Awards.

June 25, 2009 (RALEIGH, NC) – Tonic Design | Tonic Construction with Mike Cindric are recipients of  a 2009 Inform Award of Merit for their Art As Shelter project. Two hundred and nine entries in interior design, landscape architecture, and object design from architects, interior designers, landscape architects, furniture designers, industrial designers, students, and faculty from all over the mid-atlantic region were evaluated according to four general questions: Is it an innovative solution to site or program? Does it demonstrate a high level of evident craftsmanship? Does it demonstrate a high level of conceptual rigor? Is it a unique intervention?
Designed and built specifically as an integral component of the North Carolina Museum of Art’s “art-in-service” initiative, “Art as Shelter” offers visitors a sheltered place to sit and reflect upon the museum sculpture park and public greenway. The pavilion can be viewed as an object in the landscape or experienced from within, framing views of the sculptures, trail and the adjacent prairie.
“It has an ephemeral quality as an object, but it also has a definite sense of space,” notes one juror. “Sometimes when you see a project, it just hits you — and this pavilion does that.”
Large interior clear spans promote the use as an open-air classroom, a beautiful indoor/outdoor setting for teaching about art and nature. Docent-led student groups utilize the space as a studio; where folding tables, folding stools, and art-making materials are stored in frosted-acrylic clad boxes that double as benches and night time illumination. The metallic “skin” of the pavilion reflects its natural surroundings by taking on the colors of the grass and sky, or at times completely disappearing into a moiré pattern of light and shadow.
Tonic Design and Tonic Construction have won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state and regional levels and have been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, and Custom Home magazines. “Art as Shelter” has been featured in MetalMag Architecture and winner of an AIA award of merit and a Sir Walter Raleigh Award. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.
Recently Tonic Construction has been named the preferred builder for the New American Home Development, which will feature the designs of 12 local architects. Information at: www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/nah.htm.

2009-06-25T00:13:18+00:00June 25th, 2009|0 Comments

Raleigh's Tonic Design + Tonic Construction with Mike Cindric Receive AIA Triangle Design Award

The sculptural pavilion


April 21, 2009 (RALEIGH, NC) – Tonic Design | Tonic Construction with Mike Cindric are recipients of  a 2009 AIA Triangle Award for their “Art As Shelter” project. The project was selected from a large pool of entries representing work from architectural firms throughout the Triangle region.
Designed and built specifically as an integral component of the North Carolina Museum of Art Park’s “art-in-service” projects program, “Art as Shelter” offers visitors a sheltered place to sit and reflect upon the museum sculpture park and public greenway. The pavilion can be viewed as an object in the landscape or experienced from within, framing views of the sculptures, trail and the adjacent prairie.
Large interior clear spans promote the use as an open-air classroom, a beautiful indoor/outdoor setting for teaching about art and nature. Docent-led student groups utilize the space as a studio; where folding tables, folding stools, and art-making materials are stored in frosted-acrylic clad boxes that double as benches and night time illumination. The metallic “skin” of the pavilion reflects its natural surroundings by taking on the colors of the grass and sky, or at times completely disappearing into a moiré pattern of light and shadow.
Tonic Design and Tonic Construction have won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state and regional levels and have been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, and Custom Home magazines. Recently Tonic Construction has been named the preferred builder for the New American Home Development, which will feature the designs of twelve local architects. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.

2009-04-21T00:06:01+00:00April 21st, 2009|0 Comments

Raleigh's Tonic Design + Gail Peter Borden Selected for Art On The Move

March 30, 2009 (RALEIGH, NC) – Tonic Design | Tonic Construction and Gail Peter Borden, AIA, have been selected by the Raleigh Arts Commission in collaboration with Capital Area Transit ( CAT) for the second annual Art On The Move bus wrap competition. As one of 12 finalists, their design will be applied to the side of a bus, which will circulate on city bus routes and promote the work of local artists and designers.
Tonic Design + Tonic Construction and Gail Peter Borden, a former architecture professor at the NC State College of Design, have collaborated on a design for the Art On The Move submission. Interested in both civic art and increasing public awareness of local transit systems within the city of Raleigh, the team was inspired to create a design that engages CAT riders and non-riders alike.
A representation of the inner workings of the bus, the design is a two-diimensional graphic that depicts a three-dimensional space. The viewer is able to see through the bus, revealing the “inside,” riders and machinery. An image that is otherwise hidden is now exposed for public view, contemplation and imagination.
A closer look reveals a graphic “Pixelation.” A vivid representation of an oak leaf becomes the medium for depicting the lively sketch of the bus riders and inner workings. Each line is composed of a collection of diversely orientated oak leaves. A symbol of the City of Raleigh becomes the heart of the design.
The Art-on–the-Move buses will be revealed on May 16th at Artsplosure, an arts festival in downtown Raleigh.
Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, a design/build firm, has won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state, and regional levels and has been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, and Custom Home magazines. Recently Tonic Construction was named the preferred builder for the New American Home Development, which will feature homes by 12 local designers. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com

2009-03-30T23:54:26+00:00March 30th, 2009|0 Comments

Raleigh's Tonic Design and Tonic Construction and David Hill finalists for the International Gimme Shelter Competition

The Tonic/Hill “habitable wall.”


January 20, 2009 (RALEIGH, NC) — Tonic Design and Tonic Construction with NCSU College of Design professor David Hill have been selected as one of 12 finalists for GimmeShelter, an international design competition hosted by The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education.
Located in Philadelphia, PA, the Schuylkill Center is a 350-acre nature preserve and one of the first urban environmental education centers in the country. The goal of the competition is to build awareness of the applied possibilities and meaning of sustainability and its impact on our lives and our connection to the natural world.
The Tonic/Hill design was selected for the “habitable wall” concept, which incorporates nature in planning.  The angled walls allow native vines to grow; celebrating a native species, creating habitat for insects and birds, and absorbing rainwater.  The dragonflies and butterflies local to the area inspire qualities of tranquility, prospect, and refuge. An exhibit of 12 finalists’ designs will take place in February at the AIA Philadelphia in Center City Philadelphia. From the 12 finalists, six designs will be selected and built during March-April of 2009.
Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state, and regional levels and have been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, and Custom Home magazines. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.

2009-01-20T23:44:51+00:00January 20th, 2009|0 Comments

CUSTOM HOME: "Vincent Petrarca, Tonic Design-Tonic Construction, Raleigh, N.C."

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By Shelley D. Hutchins
As founder and principal architect of a design/build company, Vince Petrarca depends on high-quality products that he can provide for clients at a fair price. Thanks to smart shopping, he was able to design and build a house for his sister for just $150 a square foot. Petrarca likes AyA cabinets for their budget-friendly cost, variety of style options, and durability. For his sister’s house, he selected the flat-panel Manhattan door in natural maple. The cost of the cabinets includes installation, and that really helps Petrarca’s bottom line. “Everything is well-made from shelves to hardware,” he says.
READ MORE…

2008-09-28T19:23:22+00:00September 28th, 2008|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "Modern Resurrection"

Chiles residence


By David Hill, guest columnist

John and Molly Chiles decided to build a new modern house in North Carolina, and they found just the place for it on the resurrected bones of an old modern house.
The Ohio couple explored the more traditional option of buying a home site and building from the ground up, but they soon became fascinated with the possibility of renovating an abandoned 1960s steel frame and wood panel house overlooking Crabtree Creek in Raleigh.
Renovation does not sufficiently describe the task that lay ahead for the Chileses and Tonic Design/Construction, a local design-build firm. The house’s wood walls and floors had rotted, and it was camouflaged by a tangle of kudzu and ivy.
Vincent Petrarca of Tonic admits that the house was in terrible shape, but “still strong in concept” and full of possibilities… READ MORE…
2007-09-29T20:15:33+00:00September 29th, 2007|0 Comments

CUSTOM HOME: "Frame of Reference – A North Carolina Modernist house gets a new skin on its bones."

July/August 2007

Chiles house, Raleigh, NC. (Photo by Jim West)


By Bruce D. Snider
Time marches on. But in custom building, it doesn’t always march in a straight line. Take this house. Only 40 years old and fast headed for an early grave, it was rescued by a team of builder/architects who had not yet been born when it was new. These young craftspeople, some of them fresh out of architecture school, rebuilt it in a style that is older than their grandparents. Which, of course, we call Modernism. In spite of the looping path, however, the building arrives at the present day in very fine form. The bones of its once deteriorating structure support a house that is visually stimulating, great fun to live in, and—this time—built to last.
Vinnie Petrarca, 34, and his crew at Tonic Design had been watching the house for a while, hoping to get their hands on it before it got scraped off. Modernists by training and inclination, they liked its flat-roofed form, its exposed steel structure, and the way it seemed to float in the treetops of its steep, wooded site. The odds of finding a patron who shared their enthusiasm, though, did not look good. The house sat on a desirable lot that could be subdivided to carry two new houses. Worse, the building itself was in a miserable state. The steel frame and concrete floor decks were intact, but the rest was rapidly heading south. “It was a melting wood structure, just falling apart,” Petrarca says. When he showed the place to an Ohio couple planning to retire here in Raleigh, N.C., curb appeal was in notably short supply. “It was a rainy day in January,” Petrarca remembers, “and there were tarps all over the house.” Still, he pleaded its case. Despite appearances, he maintained, the house was still “strong in concept.” The couple left unconvinced. READ MORE…

2007-07-05T19:21:39+00:00July 5th, 2007|0 Comments

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "K + B Studio / Kitchen – hover craft"

Three young architects with a passion for craftsmanship launched their new design/build firm and this 6,000-square-foot interiors project nearly simultaneously. “Most of these modern designs require learning as you go when building them, anyway,” says principal Vincent Petrarca, Associate AIA. “We knew we could build our designs as well as a more experienced contractor because it’s all new with each house, and we see the whole picture and can anticipate how things need to be exactly.”
The soaring story-and-a-half kitchen condenses functions so the room can remain open to outdoor views. Geared to a serious cook, the work zone circulates around a large double-sided island, containing a cook-top and stainless steel surround, and a concrete eating bar…
READ MORE…

2005-06-17T20:01:46+00:00June 17th, 2005|0 Comments