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Tonic Design Honored with 11th AIA NC Award for Modern Addition to 1916 Home in Historic Cameron Park

Tonic Design Honored with 11th AIA NC Award for Modern Addition to 1916 Home in Historic Cameron Park

Tonic Design addition

Old meets new and leaves room for a backyard. Photo © Keith Isaacs

Tonic Design’s very modern addition to a red-brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 is the recipient of a 2018 Merit Award from the North Carolina chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC). This marks the 11th time Tonic Design’s partners/principals Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca have received an AIA NC design award.

The AIA NC Awards program recognizes architects regionally and nationally for exceptional design expertise. Each winning project must exceed benchmarks for outstanding architectural design, structural composition, and application of design theory.

Perforated staircase between the original house and the addition. Photo © Keith Isaacs

The solution responds to the intent of the old house, building upon its narrative of family, heritage, fine taste, and social grace. Simultaneously, it introduces an entirely new narrative that tells the story of a more open, relaxed lifestyle with 21st-century amenities and attention to energy efficiency. Both narratives are articulated through materiality (brick and steel), form (a historic foursquare box and a simple rectilinear appendage), and spatial relationships created through floorplan.

As a result, the residence has been reinvented into a home that embraces casual, modern living without having to sacrifice any of the charm and character of the historic house.

Tonic Design wrapped the 1500-square foot addition’s simple, rectilinear form in Corten® steel, lots of glass, and natural wood and kept the volume within the outer perimeters of the original house. By separating the spatial needs between two floors, the partners also provided the owners with a generous backyard despite the property’s compact size.

The 2018 AIA NC jury called Tonic Design’s solution “thoughtful.” They admired the slim, double-height space the partners slipped between old and new, which solved many potential problems and kept the back brick wall of the old house exposed inside. They appreciated the slim profile of the perforated metal staircase in the interstitial corridor that maintains the addition’s light-filled ambiance while adding easy access to the upper floor.

“We share this award with our inspirational clients and with all of the highly skilled professionals who made this challenging project a pleasure to complete,” said Petrarca.

For more information on the Hillcrest addition and Tonic Design, visit http://www.tonic-design.com/.

2018-11-05T15:24:51+00:00October 31st, 2018|0 Comments

Tonic Design Selected for WCPSS Master Professional Services Agreement

Tonic Design Selected for WCPSS Master Professional Services Agreement

To provide architecture services for Wake County public schools. 
Tonic Design

Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA

Tonic Design, a multi-award-winning architectural firm based in Raleigh, NC, has qualified to provide architecture services to the Wake County Public School System, the largest school district in North Carolina, under the WCPSS’s Master Professional Services Agreements.

To qualify, Tonic Design co-owners Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, met all criteria including:

  1. Expertise in the type of work the WCPSS would require.
  2. Number of years the firm has been in business.
  3. Successful past performance on similar projects that included handling budgets and scheduling.
  4. Awards and professional acknowledgments with letters of recommendation.
  5. Status as a minority business with 51 percent of the firm owned by, in this case, a woman.

Hogan, who is also a member of the City of Raleigh’s Appearance Commission, and Petrarca presented their qualifications to the WCPSS’s Facilities Design and Construction department. The agreement is in effect for two years

Tonic Design is currently working on a “Maker Space,” a new building for an existing private elementary school. The school’s administration wants to expand pedagogical opportunities through long-term projects and new technologies. Inspired by their mission, the partners have based the building’s form on sustainable design strategies. A large roof, for example, will define adaptable volumes of interior space and will let the students witness the sun tracking through the building during the school day,

2018-11-05T15:25:58+00:00October 1st, 2018|0 Comments

CUSTOM HOME: "Hillcrest House Addition — An Innovative Approach To Old + New"

CUSTOM HOME: “Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach To Old + New”

Tonic Design Modern Addition to Old Traditional House

During design development, a sectional opportunity presented itself that would avoid a head-on collision between old and new: a slender, double-height transitional space.
Photo by Keith Isaacs; diagram by Tonic Design

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The project involved designing a modern, 1500-square-foot addition for a two-story, red brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 in a historic inner-city neighborhood with narrow lots and minimal set-backs between houses. The addition would become the primary hub of activity for a growing family and an ideal space for entertaining. Programmatically, it would include an open kitchen, dining, living area and a spacious master bedroom suite... READ MORE 

2018-11-08T15:51:09+00:00July 20th, 2018|0 Comments

DWELL.com: "Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach to Old + New"

DWELL.com: “Hillcrest House Addition – An Innovative Approach to Old + New”

Tonic Design modern addition in Cameron Park.

A red brick Georgian Revival house built in 1916 welcomes a modern, glass and steel addition on a narrow lot in Raleigh’s Cameron Park neighborhood.

The project involved designing a modern, 1500-square-foot addition for a two-story, red brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 in a historic inner-city neighborhood with narrow lots and minimal set-backs between houses. The addition would become the primary hub of activity for a growing family and an ideal space for entertaining. Programmatically, it would include an open kitchen, dining, living area and a spacious master bedroom suite.

Tonic Design modern addition to historic house

Inside the Hillcrest addition.

Inside the Hillcrest addition.To uphold the general scale of this neighborhood and the manner in which the existing house has addressed the street for over 100 years, the addition’s mass is held within the outer planes of the old house, tucked against its rear elevation. And unlike other proposals the owners had seen, the plan divided the public and private spaces between two stories rather than letting the new construction consume the majority of the property. As a result, the architects retained a generous backyard for outdoor play space.

For the exterior walls, the architects chose Corten® steel because it is as durable as the old house’s brick veneer and it relates to its color tones. The wood siding at the rear elevation adds an element of warmth to the rugged steel, similar to the way in which the old house’s white wood trim creates softer edges against the brick.
How the existing house and the new construction linked together structurally presented the challenge. READ MORE…

2018-11-08T15:56:51+00:00July 16th, 2018|0 Comments

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST: "11 Must-See Houses in The Woods: Beautiful Modern Forest Houses"

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST: “11 Must-See Houses in The Woods: Beautiful Modern Forest Houses”

A house in the woods doesn’t have to be rustic….

1700 Glenwood

…Piedmont Retreat

Durham, North Carolina
Tonic Design devised this Corten steel–clad home in a wooded neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina. The exterior is designed to weather and eventually blend in with the surroundings. The rear of the two-story, 3,800-square-foot house is glazed to take advantage of the forest views. READ MORE

2018-11-08T15:58:16+00:00June 2nd, 2018|0 Comments

ARCH DAILY.com: "Piedmont Retreat/Tonic Design"

ARCH DAILY.com: “Piedmont Retreat/Tonic Design”

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Rear elevation overlooking the forest. (Tzu Chen Photography)

Wrapped in vertical stripes of Corten® steel street-side, with vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows overlooking the forest behind it, a modern house sits quietly in the corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham.
Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design in Raleigh are responsible for this creative two-story, 3800-square-foot, single-family structure that will, as the steel continues to weather, blend into the natural setting and never need painting. Their clients loved the concept since they wanted a low-maintenance house with a modest public presence.
The owners also wanted to maintain a direct visual connection to their beautiful wooded site. The abundant glazing fulfills that wish. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:26:37+00:00April 27th, 2018|0 Comments

Steel-Clad House in Duke Forest Receives 2018 AIA Triangle Honor Award

Steel-Clad House in Duke Forest Receives 2018 AIA Triangle Honor Award

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Street-facing facade

Piedmont Retreat,” a modern, single-family home clad in Cor-Ton® steel, earned for Tonic Design of Raleigh, NC, one of only three Honor awards — and the only residential design among the three — in the 2018 AIA Triangle Design Awards. The awards were presented March 22 during a gala event at the Contemporary Art Museum in downtown Raleigh.
Partners in life and practice, Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca have now received 10 AIA Triangle Design Awards for the practice. This is their third honor award.

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Rear elevation overlooking the forest.

According to the partners, the clients wanted their new house to have a modest public presence and a direct connection to their property’s wooded landscape within its cul-de-sac neighborhood on the edge of Durham within Duke Forest. They also wanted a private, comfortable, low-maintenance house that would blur the boundaries between indoor and outdoor spaces.
Minimal in form and materials, Piedmont Retreat’s steel exterior forms a protective barrier to the street and presents a humble profile to the neighborhood. This rugged, weathering skin will eventually find its final patina and blend into the landscape.

Piedmont Retreat-23 copy_0

Inside Tonic Design’s award-winning “Piedmont Retreat”

In contrast, the living spaces open to an array of shifting perspectival views within and throughout the house.
Alex Anmahian, AIA, founding partner of the internationally acclaimed firm AW in Cambridge, MA, served as chair of the all-Boston jury. Anmahian, who teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University GSD, announced the winners, noting that the jury admired Tonic Design’s “consistency of message” throughout the submission and the “restrained palette of materials and textures,” among other attributes.
SM_Piedmont Retreat3 copy
“We’re especially honored to have our work recognized by this year’s jury,” Hogan said, “all of whom are highly respected, practicing professors of architecture.”
Seven design awards were presented this year: three Honor and four Merit. Click here for more information on the 2018 AIA Triangle Design Awards. Click here for more information on Tonic Design.

2018-11-05T15:26:44+00:00March 26th, 2018|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "The Kamphoefner Prize"

NEWS & OBSERVER: “The Kamphoefner Prize”

Modern architects Raleigh, NC

Katherine and Vinny with The Kamphoefner Prize certificate.

By J. Michael Welton
(Following a tribute to the late Brian Shawcorft, FAIA)
One of the most coveted prizes in North Carolina architecture is the award for modern design established by Henry and Mabel Kamphoefner in 1988. It was first given to Norman Pease Jr. – and to Shawcroft in 1991.
The Kamphoefners set a high bar, seeking an architect or firm that “demonstrated a consistent integrity and devotion over an acceptable period of time to further the development of the modern movement in architecture without yielding to any of the undesirable current clichés, neo-modernistic mannerisms or artless historicism that have flawed the building culture of today.”
Lofty? Yes. Opinionated? Absolutely. But North Carolina’s modern architecture is built upon these standards. This award is designed to encourage great work – no matter the age of the winners.
In 2017, it went to Raleigh’s Tonic Design – and partners Vinny Petrarca, 45, and Katherine Hogan, 36. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:30:31+00:00February 4th, 2018|0 Comments

METAL ARCHITECTURE: "A Modern Retreat"

METAL ARCHITECTURE: “A Modern Retreat”

Corten steel helps residence blend into surroundings seamlessly.

By Marcy Marro Editor

Tonic Design

Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

Located in a wooded cul-de-sac neighborhood in Durham, N.C., this single-family residence, nicknamed Piedmont Retreat, is wrapped in vertical Corten steel panels facing the street, and vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows in the back that overlook the surrounding forest.

The owners reached out to Raleigh, N.C.-based Tonic Design and Tonic Construction to design and build the residence. “It’s a corner lot,” says Vincent Petrarca, co-owner, designer and contractor at Tonic Design, “so the house really had to respond to the two streets. And for us, trying to create a place that’s calm and a getaway, the idea of even a few streetlights at night on the corner, the house really had to turn its back on the street. So the house created this hard shell to that side of the property, and then it really opens up, like a geode, looking down the Piedmont ravine into the mature forest.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:30:54+00:00December 12th, 2017|0 Comments

INHABITAT: "Weathered steel and reclaimed materials blend a modern home into the woods."

INHABITAT: “Weathered steel and reclaimed materials blend a modern home into the woods.”

Tonic Design

Corten® steel provides a modest, low-maintenance exterior (it will never need painting) that will eventually weather to blend into the natural setting. Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

by Lucy Wang
Raleigh-based Tonic Design completed a creative new home that plays with the contrast between old and new through the use of reclaimed and contemporary materials. Tucked into the forests of Durham, the Piedmont Retreat is a 3,800-square-foot single-family home that embraces the outdoors in its use of weathered materials and large cantilevered windows. Reclaimed materials, like oak flooring and factory lights, help soften the modern steel and glass construction. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:31:17+00:00December 11th, 2017|0 Comments

Tonic Design Partner Appointed to Raleigh Appearance Commission

Tonic Design Partner Appointed to Raleigh Appearance Commission

KH_headshotThe Raleigh City Council has appointed architect Katherine Hogan, AIA (right), co-owner of Tonic Design, to the Raleigh Appearance Commission.

The City Council established The Appearance Commission in 1973 to provide guidance, advice, and recommendations regarding the visual quality and aesthetic characteristics of the City of Raleigh. The commission consists of 15 members, the majority of whom have special training or experience in architecture, landscape architecture, horticulture, city planning, or related design fields. Members serve for two years before they must be reappointed by the City Council.
The Appearance Commission also appoints standing committees for special design-related outreach and education efforts such as the Sir Walter Raleigh Awards, which recognize outstanding new contributions to the city’s character, environment, and appearance.

Hogan and her partner and co-owner at Tonic Design, Vincent Petrarca, have been the recipients of the Sir Walter Awards four times, most recently for renovating/renewing the building at 1700 Glenwood Avenue that now houses Form & Function, the building owners’ retail shop.

The Commission meets twice a month in the Council Chamber of the Raleigh Municipal Building. The meetings are open to the public.

For more information on the Raleigh Appearance Commission, go to www.raleighnc.gov.

For more information on Katherine Hogan, AIA, visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-05T15:31:52+00:00November 27th, 2017|0 Comments

DWELL: "Piedmont Retreat, Durham, NC"

DWELL: “Piedmont Retreat, Durham, NC”

Tonic Design

Corten® steel provides a modest, low-maintenance exterior (it will never need painting) that will eventually weather to blend into the natural setting. Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

Wrapped in vertical stripes of Corten® steel street-side, with vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows overlooking the forest behind it, a modern house in the corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham dubbed “Piedmont Retreat” was honored recently with a Merit Award during the 2017 AIA North Carolina Residential Design Awards program.
Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design in Raleigh are responsible for this creative two-story, single-family structure that will, as the steel continues to weather, blend into the natural setting and never need painting. Their clients loved the concept since they wanted a low-maintenance house with a modest public presence. READ MORE…

2018-11-05T15:32:57+00:00October 31st, 2017|0 Comments

CUSTOM BUILDER: "Backstory: Playing Both Sides"

CUSTOM BUILDER: “Backstory: Playing Both Sides”

A creative duo’s partnership is driven by client needs, site specifics, and school schedules

By Stacey Freed

Masonry, glass, metal, concrete … these are the building materials that Vincent “Vinny” Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, owners of the firms Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, in Raleigh, N.C., favor. “These things last over time,” Hogan says. “For over 20 years, we’ve been watching as our projects age and evolve,” she adds. The couple believes it all comes down to detailing and materials. Petrarca and Hogan, whose work has won numerous awards, put great stock in the idea that every project they do is unique—with a “particular site, a client with a vision, a budget,” Petrarca says. READ MORE…
2018-11-05T15:33:39+00:00October 5th, 2017|0 Comments

Making History: Katherine Hogan, Vincent Petrarca Receive Kamphoefner Prize for Modern Architecture

Making History: Katherine Hogan, Vincent Petrarca Receive Kamphoefner Prize for Modern Architecture

The first husband-wife partnership to be selected.

September 25, 2017 (Raleigh, NC) — Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca, partners in life and in the award-winning Raleigh firm Tonic Design, were honored to receive the 2017 Kamphoefner Prize at the AIA North Carolina Design Conference held in Wilmington September 13-15.
Named for the founding dean of NC State University’s School (now College) of Design, Henry Kamphoefner (1907-1990), the $10,000 Prize is one of the highest honors for practicing architects in the state.
This marks the first time the Prize has been awarded to a husband-wife partnership.
“Everything we design, we design together,” Petrarca stressed. “So the only possible way we could receive this incredible honor or any other award is together.”
“It is an honor to be recognized among those who are dedicated to forwarding the modern tradition in our place,” Hogan added. “We have many mentors on this list of past recipients, who we have followed and been inspired by over the years. We are honored to be recognized as part of this group.”
Among past Kamphoefner Prize recipients are AIA Fellows Arthur Cogswell, Frank Harmon, Jeffrey Lee, Kenneth Hobgood, Ellen Weinstein, Phil Szostak, and Roger Cannon.
The Path Leading to The Prize
Over the past decade, Hogan and Petrarca have amassed an array of awards and honors:

  • They’ve already received 41 design awards, including 27 awards sanctioned by the American Institute of Architects (AIA).
  • Their work has been published over 40 times in magazines, professional journals, architectural websites, and blogs.
  • They’ve lectured at architecture schools and design conferences since 2007, including the AIA National Convention.
  • They’re served their profession in various capacities through AIANC, AIA Triangle, and both NC State and Syracuse universities. They’ve also served on numerous professional awards juries.
  • Since 2011, they have been adjunct professors at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and Visiting Critics at Syracuse University. They’ve also served as guest jurors for architectural studios at five different universities, including the University of Illinois in Chicago.
  • In 2013, they were named Residential Architect magazine’s “Rising Stars” out of all young firms in the nation.
  • In 2014, Hogan received Triangle Business Journal’sWomen In Business “Future Star” award.

Kamphoefner Prize winners must be currently practicing in North Carolina and must have consistently contributed to the development of modern architecture for at least 10 years “without yielding to any of the undesirable current clichés, neo-modernistic mannerisms or artless historicism that have flawed the building culture of today,” as Dean Kamphoefner wrote when he and his wife, Mable, established the Prize in the 1980s.
Attesting to the Tonic duo’s consistent contributions, Will Bruder, FAIA, of Will Bruder Architects, Phoenix, AZ, wrote in his Letter of Support, “Their design solutions have become both distinctively original and memorably relevant. Their work exemplifies not only the best traditions of modernism but also an abiding respect for the clients and communities they serve,” he wrote.
“Katherine and Vinny both honor the architectural tradition that Dean Kamphoefner envisioned,” Michael Speaks, Ph.D., Dean and Professor, Syracuse University School of Architecture, noted in his letter.
And J. Patrick Rand, FAIA, a Distinguished Professor of Architecture at the NCSU College of Design, asserted his belief that their work “transcends necessity and moves toward poetry, but does so with a language that is the fusion of conceptual ideals and practical circumstances. [Their] buildings show that proportion, materiality, space and experience are the essential contents of architecture.”
For more information on The Kamphoefner Prize, visit www.aiancawards.org.

 

2018-11-05T15:34:02+00:00September 25th, 2017|0 Comments

Sir Walter Salutes Five Points Icon: Tonic Design receives 2017 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for 1700 Glenwood

Sir Walter Salutes Five Points Icon: Tonic Design receives 2017 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for 1700 Glenwood

1700-glenwood6

1700 Glenwood Avenue – before (bottom) and after (top)

For transforming an odd, vacant eyesore into a gleaming glass, energy-efficient commercial building that deserves its place at the pinnacle of Raleigh’s Five Points intersection, Tonic Design principals Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca received a 2017 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Community Appearance for their work on the building at 1700 Glenwood Avenue.
The awards jury called Tonic Design’s work “a well-done project in a very visible location” and noted the manner in which the 5800-square-foot structure “provides lots of light [and] awesome views from within at all levels.”
The mid-century modern, two-story building at the junction of Glenwood Avenue, Fairview Road, and Whitaker Mill houses three thriving businesses today. Yet it has fascinated passersby since 1964 when it was built for a progressive dry cleaner who enclosed the upper story in glass to show off its state-of-the-art mechanization. In 1979, an audio repair and computer equipment business took over the space and, for 28 years, Raleigh residents knew it as the “Audio Buys building.”
Audio Buys closed in 2007 and the building sat vacant for four years. In 2011, the owners hired Tonic Design, an award-winning design-build firm, to upgrade it for leasing to a new generation of tenants.
After installing new, insulated glazing, a custom shade system over the floor-o-ceiling glass walls, and zinc siding, the building could now shade its interior from glare and reduces summer heat gain by more than 70 percent. Yet it continued to languish uninhabited.
In 2016, new owners called the Tonic partners back in, this time to increase the building’s function and make it more accessible. Among other improvements, the duo created a new glass-enclosed entry, staircase, and elevator tower; transformed the existing roof into a roof garden with spectacular views in every direction; and added a two-story steel sculpture by McConnell Studios, entitled “Continuum,” to the West Whitaker elevation.
Tonic’s award emanated from the Rehabilitation/History Preservation category, which honors the preservation or rehabilitation of existing buildings, especially Raleigh’s historic resources. “The designers have done a great job further repurposing a building instead of knocking it down,” the jury commented.
For more information on the Sir Walter Raleigh Awards for Community Appearance, go to www.raleighnc.gov/sirwalterraleighawards. For more information on 1700 Glenwood Avenue and Tonic Design, visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-05T15:34:30+00:00September 14th, 2017|0 Comments

Modern Residence in Cameron Park To Be Open For Public Touring September 6th

Modern Residence in Cameron Park To Be Open For Public Touring September 6th

During the evening “ModHop” Tour of private houses in Raleigh Hawthorne Exterior_Streetview

(Photos by Raymond Goodman)
 The Hawthorne Residence (above left), a modern, award-winning home in Raleigh’s historic Cameron Park neighborhood, will be open to the public during the “ModHop” Tour, an evening house tour on September 6th from 6 –  8:30 p.m. hosted by North Carolina Modernist Houses in association with the 2017 Hopscotch Design Festival.
Designed and built by Tonic Design principles Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca, this single-family home replaced a dark, cramped, early 20th-century bungalow to give the owners modernist light, space, and form, and a strong connection between indoors and outdoors.
To achieve the indoor-outdoor connection, the designers dropped the back elevation to grade and used floor-to-ceiling glass on the exterior wall to expand the view and living space into the backyard. A single-tilt roof with deep, cantilevered overhangs reference the covered porches of neighboring houses. Operable windows and extensive glazing throughout the house allow for daylight and natural ventilation, greatly reducing the homeowners’ reliance on electric lights during the day. A geothermal ground-source heat pump, fiber-cement rain-screen panels on exterior walls, locally available wood detailing, and Energy Star appliances make it 50 percent more energy efficient than a standard new home and 80 percent more efficient than the average resale home.
tonic design, Modernist house in Cameron Park
The two-story house is transparent from the front door through the main living area (above) and on through the kitchen and dining space to the backyard. A sleek staircase composition makes the vertical circulation a sculptural presence at the center of the interior while leading to the children’s bedrooms and central play space upstairs. Crisp white walls and warm wood flooring throughout the house underscore the simple, modern interior.
Hogan and Petrarca will be on hand to answer tour participants’ questions about the Hawthorne Residence during the ModHop Tour.
For more information on the tour and to purchase tickets, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/modhop17.
For more information on Tonic Design, visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-05T15:35:16+00:00August 30th, 2017|0 Comments

Walter Magazine Features Lowe’s Pavillion

Walter Magazine Features Lowe’s Pavillion

ILowes-Pavilion-NCMA.jpgn their latest issue, Walter Magazine features unique minimalist structures in the Triangle area.
Spotlighting Lowe’s Pavillon and other NCMA architectural pieces, the writer notes:

They’re diversions in the landscape, placed to punctuate and celebrate the visual richness of the grounds. But they’re not only meant to be seen – they also provide a vantage point to better appreciate the beauty of their own surroundings.

Read more at WalterMagazine.com.

2018-11-05T15:35:37+00:00November 2nd, 2016|0 Comments

Crabill Modern Awarded AIA SAR Award

Crabill Modern Awarded AIA SAR Award

Photography by: Randy Thompson

The South Atlantic Region of the American Institute of Architects Recognizes 19 Projects for Design Excellence.
 Over 150 people celebrated the work of firms from Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina on September 30, 2016 at the SCAD Museum of Art in downtown Savannah, GA.
Tonic took home the Housing Award for their work on Crabill Modern.

“Extreme budget constraints often halt a project, but in this instance have produced amazing results.  Beautifully conceived, presented and executed, this project captured the jury’s imagination by virtue of its clarity and formal inventiveness,” noted the jury. “Especially striking is the use of analogous forms found in the surrounding contexts of landscape and agrarian structures. Constructed from the ground up for less than many renovation projects, this house extends a proposition beyond the limits of its own walls in working towards making well designed housing accessible to a greater percentage of the population.”

A total of 19 awards were presented to regional architecture firms in five categories: Adaptive Reuse/Preservation, Housing, Interior Architecture, Unrealized and New Construction/Substantial Renovation. Also presented were two Student Design Awards in recognition of excellent work by students enrolled in an architecture, interior design or urban design program in the South Atlantic region. In addition, the AIA SAR Council bestowed the 2016 Roger Milliken Legacy Award upon Paula Wallace, Hon. AIA, Founder and President of the Savannah College of Art and Design.

The design awards were presented by Steve Dumez, FAIA, Principal and Director of Design, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple in New Orleans, LA, who served as the 2016 SAR Design Awards Jury Chair.

2018-11-05T15:37:39+00:00October 5th, 2016|0 Comments

N&O: A New Model for Architecture

N&O: A New Model for Architecture

t1003-Audio-Buys (1)

1700 Glenwood

The News and Observer shares the advantages of an architect-led design-build. Read more. They feature 1700 Glenwood, a current tonic project:
1700 Glenwood, Tonic Design and Tonic Construction
A vintage 1965 midcentury modern landmark, 1700 Glenwood has benefitted from two renovations at the hands of Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan. The first, in 2011, was a classic design-build for a new aesthetic and a reduction in solar gain. That meant energy-efficient glass, a sunscreen and a zinc skin – all for $180,000. “We were working backward from the dollar amount,” Petrarca says. “If we’d bid it out, it would have blown the budget, and the first thing they’d take out would be the sunscreen.” Today they’re working as architects on a new renovation there – with contractors Riley Lewis. And though it’s a traditional process, design-build prepped them for the job. “We’re working with them and talking to them like contractors,” Hogan says. “That’s why the project has gone smoothly, even though it’s fast-tracked.”

2018-11-05T16:01:29+00:00August 23rd, 2016|0 Comments

Triangle Business Journal: The plans for Raleigh’s 1700 Glenwood building in Five Points

Triangle Business Journal: The plans for Raleigh’s 1700 Glenwood building in Five Points

t1003-Audio-Buys (1)

1700 Glenwood

New owners of the old Audio Buys building at Five Points in Raleigh will soon be bringing new people and commerce back into the 1960s-era, Modernist-style building.
Rick Carol Marcotte, owners of the Form & Function interior design and store store on Bernard Street, purchased the odd, two-story building at the corner point at Glenwood Avenue, Whitaker Mill Road and Fairview Road in December, and the couple has recently started releasing details about their plans there. Read more on BizJournals.com.

2018-11-05T16:01:20+00:00April 29th, 2016|0 Comments

Tonic Design Earns 35th Award for Renovation of Iconic Five Points Modernist Building and Hillsborough Home Nabs AIA Triangle Award For Design Excellence and Energy Efficiency

Tonic Design Earns 35th Award for Renovation of Iconic Five Points Modernist Building and Hillsborough Home Nabs AIA Triangle Award For Design Excellence and Energy Efficiency

Tonic Design, a Raleigh-based architecture firm, won two of the seven Design Awards given out at last week’s AIA Triangle Awards. The firm was recognized for their work on the 1700 Glenwood Building, an iconic piece of Five-Points/Raleigh architecture, as well as Crabill Modern, located in Hillsborough.

Originally built in the mid-1960s to house one of the most progressive drycleaners in the country, 1700 Glenwood has become a quintessential piece of the Raleigh architecture community even during an extended vacancy.  After the owners were encouraged to undertake a renovation, they brought on Tonic Design to achieve a proactive architectural solution towards sustainability and an energy-efficient future. The building now shades its interior space from glare and reduces summer heat gain by more than 70%.

“As we lose more and more of Raleigh’s mid-century modern architectural gems, it is inspiring to work with an owner who saw the value in restoring something so unique to its original glory,” says Katherine. “Hopefully, the recognition this project is generating will help others realize that renovation and restoration are viable options.”
Likewise, Tonic approached the Crabill Modern Residence with the goal of making innovative modern design accessible to a broader range of families. At a modest budget, they created a unique living space on a five-acre property in a clearing amidst a lush forest. Through imaginative architecture, they were able to create a unique live/work environment for the owners, a family of four.

The house’s skewed cubic form is clad in Cor-Ten steel panels that act as a rain screen and sun shade. As time passes, the Cor-Ten will develop a rich patina that will liken rusted farm buildings in the area.

“As time goes forward, we’re catching up to the past, in a way,” says owner John Crabill.

2018-11-05T16:00:47+00:00April 26th, 2016|0 Comments

Builder Magazine

Builder Magazine features tonic’s design of the contemporary kitchen in the Hawthorne Residence:

builder

NORTH CAROLINA KITCHEN FACILITATES FAMILY INTERACTION

Sophisticated design touches balance a kid-friendly layout in this contemporary Raleigh home.

By Jennifer Goodman

This contemporary kitchen makes entertaining friends and family or even just cooking for the kids fun and easy. It was designed to allow the homeowners to prepare meals or socialize while keeping an eye on their children. The youngsters can play in the backyard just beyond the large sliding glass doors while mom and dad get dinner ready, hang out with friends, or do the dishes—all the while within sight of each other. 

Read the article on Builder.com.

2018-11-05T15:59:34+00:00January 6th, 2016|0 Comments

2015 Dwell Design Guide

2015 Dwell Design Guide

tonic is featured in this year’s Dwell’s Definitive List of Architects and Designers Worldwide:

2018-11-05T15:59:09+00:00December 21st, 2015|0 Comments

Raleigh Urban Design Center Presents Lecture by tonic design

Raleigh Urban Design Center Presents Lecture by tonic design

UDCtalks675x150

Multigenerational Living: The Resurgence of a Forgotten Housing Typology

When: Thursday, November 19, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Where: COR Museum, 220 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, NC 27601
Speakers: Katherine Hogan, AIA & Vincent Petrarca of tonic design

During this UDC Talk, tonic design principals Katherine Hogan, AIA and Vincent Petrarca will speak about their practice, past projects in Raleigh, and research into alternative housing types and housing diversity within our city.

tonic’s work fuses together history and the present, representing an important typology of architecture today. The lecture is free and open to the public.

“We are passionate about good design and contributing to our city and are honored to have the opportunity to speak about our work and interest in the topic of multigenerational housing,” notes Hogan.

“As parents of young children, we believe that there is an architectural solution to not only pull resources and live economically, but also to enjoy the benefit and shared knowledge of three generations.”

About tonic design | tonic construction:

tonic design | tonic construction principals Katherine Hogan, AIA and Vincent Petrarca were named 2013’s “Rising Stars” by Residential Architect magazine. Their projects have been featured in many national publications, including Architectural Record, Residential Architect, Dwell, Custom Home, Inform magazine, and Metal Magazine. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com and follow tonic on Facebook

About Raleigh Urban Design:

The Raleigh Urban Design Center is a team of urban designers and planners who envision and design solutions that create a better built environment for the City of Raleigh. By engaging and leading the people of Raleigh in deliberate, targeted design discussions, we build consensus around innovative solutions that encourage all people to be active in shaping the physical form of their community.

*Landscape Architects may be approved for 1.5 credits through the NC Board of Landscape Architects for attending this lecture.

2018-11-05T15:59:03+00:00November 19th, 2015|0 Comments

“Rank Residence” Receives Merit AIA North Carolina Award

“Rank Residence” Receives Merit AIA North Carolina Award

t1102-Rank_2September 26, 2015 (Durham, NC) The Rank Residence or “House for a Rockstar,” received the 2015 Merit Award during the American Institute of Architects North Carolina Chapter Design and Chapter Awards Gala hosted at Durham’s 21c Hotel.

The residence, designed and constructed by Tonic and completed in 2012, was built with a modern-gothic feel and features unique, tall vertical spaces. The windows provide the desired privacy while playing on the idea of “arrow loop” windows, which once provided protection for archers inside gothic castles.

On the ground floor, the four-car garage provides room for his muscle cars and dragster. The eleven foot tall concrete entry stair provides access to the home’s main level and its triple height living space. The upper two levels contain bedrooms, a library, and a studio where the musician can write and record his music.
Find out more.

The residence has also been recognized in Dwell Magazine and the News & Observer and was awarded the 2013 George Matsumoto First Prize as well as the 2013 AIA Triangle Merit Award.

2018-11-05T15:58:12+00:00September 26th, 2015|0 Comments

Katherine Hogan Inspires as Panelist at Innovate Raleigh Summit

Katherine Hogan Inspires as Panelist at Innovate Raleigh Summit

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Katherine Hogan, AIA, Principal of tonic design | tonic construction, appeared as a panelist at the Innovate Raleigh Summit, an annual event to connect entrepreneurs with resources in the Raleigh community.

The discussion focused on the cultural identity of Raleigh and how the plans for it’s future can encourage interconnectivity among different communities. She spoke to the fact that tonic design | tonic construction continually breaks boundaries in their communities through their art, blending old with new and innovation with tradition in each of their projects.
“It was an honor to be a part of this panel and included in the discussion about the growth of our city,” said Katherine Hogan, AIA, “Design should always be an integral part of this discussion and we should consider how we can build better and more high quality buildings and public spaces that we can be proud.”

After the panel concluded, Katherine joined other industry leaders to lead discussions on her career story and what led her to success.

Other panelists included John Kane (Kane Realty Corporation), Patrice Gilmore (Holt Brothers Construction), John Holmes (Hobby Properties), Sam Crutchfield (Grubb Ventures) and featured moderator Mitchell Silver of the New York City Parks Department.

2018-11-05T15:57:47+00:00September 10th, 2015|0 Comments

Tonic Design Awarded the George Matsumoto Prize for Fourth Time

Tonic Design Awarded the George Matsumoto Prize for Fourth Time

matsumto prize 2015July 23, 2015 (Raleigh, NC) – For the fourth year in a row, tonic design | tonic construction has taken top honors in the George Matsumoto Prize for Modernist residential design throughout North Carolina. The prize was sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across the state from the  mid-century to today.

Partners Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, received second place in the “Jury Awards” category for the Crabill Modern residence they designed and built in Hillsborough, NC. The home is a reinterpretation of a two-story house, with spatial overlaps and plenty of open space and a minimal footprint.
This was Tonic’s fourth consecutive prize in the competition. Last year, the firm’s Smart-Stell Residence in Durham, NC received First Place in the Jury Awards category. In 2013, Tonic’s Rank Residence in Pittsboro, NC won First Place in the Jury Awards category. Also, the Walters Residence received Third Place in NCMH’s awards program.

About The George Matsumoto Prize
The George Matsumoto Prize for North Carolina Modernist residential architecture is a unique design competition featuring $6,000 in awards, a blue-ribbon jury of internationally known architects and designers, and online public voting.  NCMH created the Matsumoto Prize in 2012 honor of George Matsumoto FAIA, one of the founding faculty members of North Carolina State University’s School of Design who designed some of North Carolina’s most well-known and well-loved Modernist houses.  
The Matsumoto Prize is the only juried architecture competition in North Carolina that focuses exclusively on Modernist houses, provides financial awards, involves a national jury plus public voting, and connects to a major architectural archive.  The Prize meaningfully and powerfully engages the public with the architecture they love and showcases exceptional Modernist architects and designers in North Carolina.  The 2015 Prize was underwritten by Leland Little Auctions.

2018-11-05T15:57:34+00:00July 23rd, 2015|0 Comments

Tonic Design partners to give Keynote Lecture at the 2015 CSI Memphis BUILD/IT Show

Tonic Design partners to give Keynote Lecture at the 2015 CSI Memphis BUILD/IT Show

Lecture Poster
April 04, 2015 (Raleigh, NC) –tonic design | tonic construction, a design-build firm, is pleased to announce that principles Katherine Hogan, AIA and Vincent Petrarca, will give the Keynote Lecture at the 2015 CSI Memphis BUILD/IT Show on Thursday, April 9th at 4:00 p.m. at Minglewood Hall in Memphis, TN.
The lecture, entitled “Working Backwards,” will highlight their hybrid model of professional practice – construction-led-design. Through an overview of their past and future projects, Hogan and Petrarca will describe their values and practice methodology and how it has shaped their approach to architecture.
With the flexibility to take on the role of designer or general contractor or both, Tonic’s knowledge of construction and design is a valuable editing device for the work they produce, and it increases the scope of their influence on the final product. As a methodology, Tonic embraces the influence of construction on design, and design on construction as the fundamental premise that defines our work, while aspiring to the highest level of craft.
The BUILD/IT show is comprised of panelist, speakers and more than 53 design and construction vendors showcasing the latest building products. Hogan says, “We are looking forward to presenting our work and our practice methodology at a conference focused on the construction industry, but also attended by architects. We value being part of the discussion about both construction and architecture and learning from the other participants.”
For more information on tonic design | tonic construction, visit: www.tonic-design.com.
For more information about the 2015 CSI Memphis BUILD/IT Show, visit:
http://csimemphis.org/index_buildit_home.htm
About tonic design | tonic construction:
tonic design | tonic construction is an award-winning design-build firm in Raleigh, NC. As two separate but interacting companies, tonic design | tonic construction has the flexibility to take on the role of architect or general contractor, or to collaborate together as a design-build firm. Principals Katherine Hogan and Vincent Petrarca were named 2013’s “Rising Stars” by Residential Architect magazine. Their projects have been featured in many national publications, including Architectural RecordResidential Architect, DwellCustom Home, Inform magazine, and Metal Magazine. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-05T15:56:44+00:00June 3rd, 2015|0 Comments

tonic design | tonic construction principles give lecture at Syracuse University School of Architecture

tonic design | tonic construction principles give lecture at Syracuse University School of Architecture

Syracuse University Spring 2015 Lecture series

Syracuse University Spring 2015 Lecture series

February 23, 2015 (Raleigh, NC) –tonic design | tonic construction, a design-build firm, is pleased to announce that principles Katherine Hogan, AIA and Vincent Petrarca, will give a lecture at Syracuse University School of Architecture as part of the Spring ’15 Architecture Lecture Series on Tuesday, February 24th at 5:00 p.m. and is open to the public.
The lecture, entitled “Working Backwards,” will highlight their hybrid model of professional practice – construction-led-design. Through an overview of their past and future projects, Hogan and Petrarca will describe their values and practice methodology and how it has shaped their approach to architecture.
With the flexibility to take on the role of designer or general contractor or both, Tonic’s knowledge of construction and design is a valuable editing device for the work they produce, and it increases the scope of their influence on the final product. As a methodology, Tonic embraces the influence of construction on design (construction-led design) and design on construction as the fundamental premise that defines our work.
Other speakers for this lecture series include Marlon Blackwell, Aaron Betsky, Gena Wirth, and Bjarke Ingels.
Spring 2015 Richard Gluckman Visiting Critics
This semester Hogan and Petrarca have been selecated as Richard Gluckman Endowed Visiting Critics at the school. Together they are teaching a studio on dwelling with sites based in Raleigh, NC, the home of their practice and a small but rapidly developing city.
Hogan says, “It is truly an honor to be back on campus, teaching and lecturing at the School of Architecture. We have a very talented group of students who are producing exceptional work.” Hogan is a ’05 graduate of the school.
As two separate, but constantly interacting companies, Tonic Design and Tonic Construction work toward and execute sensitive modern design solutions that make a difference in the lives of our clients and contribute to the rich, existing architectural fabric of the community.
For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.
For more information on Syracuse University School of Architecture Visiting Critic Program visit
https://soa.syr.edu/people/visting-critics/

2018-11-05T15:56:32+00:00March 12th, 2015|0 Comments

Adaptive Re-Use Project By Tonic Design Receives AIA NC Award

Adaptive Re-Use Project By Tonic Design Receives AIA NC Award

For transforming an old masonry building into a light-filled space for working and living.

The "Live Work" home/studio near downtown Raleigh.

The “Live Work” home/studio near downtown Raleigh.

“Live Work,” the transformation of a derelict building into a 650-square-foot combination home and design studio by Tonic Design+ Tonic Construction in Raleigh received a Merit Award during the American Institute of Architects North Carolina Chapter’s 2014 Design and Chapter Awards Gala held in Charlotte this year.

Located on the edge of a mixed-use neighborhood (industrial and residential) near downtown Raleigh, the one-story masonry building was in dire disrepair. Rather than raze it, however, Tonic’s team decided to “recycle” it into studio space up front for the young firm and living quarters in back for the principals/married couple Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, and their one young daughter initially.

Petrarca and Hogan describe the design-build project as “an exercise in balance, reduction and efficiency…[linking] architectural practice, financial stability, and local community.” In just 13 weeks, including time to purchase the property and get all necessary permits, the firm and three summer interns from NC State University’s College of Design planned and renovated the living/working space, which includes a small walled garden that, in effect, doubles the living space and connects the indoors to the outdoors. To allow natural light to penetrate the interior, the designers raised the roof by 12 inches and installed a band of clerestory windows.

The living quarters originally combined bedroom/living room, dining room, and kitchen in one space. When a second daughter came along, the partners “borrowed” some space from the studio to create a separate bedroom. An abundance of built-in cabinets keeps the diminutive space organized and uncluttered.

“Live Work” was submitted to AIA NC’s new Residential Design category, which is intended to “recognize architects whose designs answer the unique requests of the clients and the diverse landscape of North Carolina,” according to the website.

The AIA NC honor marks the 26th design award this young firm has received. For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.
For more information on the 2014 AIA NC Design Awards, go to www.aiancawards.org.

2018-11-05T16:05:34+00:00October 27th, 2014|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "Modest modern for simple living in Cameron Park"

NEWS & OBSERVER: “Modest modern for simple living in Cameron Park”

Contributed report by Kim Weiss

tonic design, Modernist house in Cameron Park

View from the living space at the front of the house all the way to the backyard.

“Modest Modern” — that’s what Abby Ross calls the new house in Raleigh’s Cameron Park neighborhood that she shares with her husband, Sean, and their children Noah, 7, and Chloe, 4.
Designed and built by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction of Raleigh, the Rosses’ one-story 1700sf house became a two-story 3400sf Modern house with clean lines, clear volumes, open multi-use spaces, and a strong connection between indoors and outdoors. Yet its size and siting (in line with its neighbors), and exterior materials (charcoal and gray concrete rain-screen panels with wood detailing), make this Modern house a quiet, friendly addition to Cameron Park’s established neighborhood west of downtown Raleigh…
Click on the links below to see the entire article:
N&O: Modest Modern
N&O: Modest Modern, page 2

2018-11-05T16:04:50+00:00October 20th, 2014|0 Comments

THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER: "Inside Architecture’s One-Stop Shop"

THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER: “Inside Architecture’s One-Stop Shop”

Anna Bergren Miller looks into how architect-led design-build can deliver more for less. 
ART AS SHELTER, RALEIGH, NC, TONIC DESIGN.

ART AS SHELTER, RALEIGH, NC, TONIC DESIGN.

“The typical process of architecture is broken.” So begins a slideshow on the website of GLUCK+, the New York firm known for its practice—and advocacy—of architect-led design build. Design-build differs from conventional project delivery in that a single firm is responsible for both design and construction. Proponents of the method argue that by repairing the breach between architecture and building design-build benefits both clients and architects, and produces better designs…
…Clients save money under design-build, though how much is up for debate. BUILD suggests that the process reduces project costs by about 10 percent. The most widely cited figures, touted by the Design-Build Institute of America and other proponents of the method, come from a 16-year-old study by the Construction Industry Institute (CII) and Penn State, which found that design-build lowered unit costs 6.1 percent over design-bid-build. For Katherine Hogan, co-owner of tonic design | tonic construction in Raleigh, North Carolina, the financial advantage of design-build is harder to pin down, yet nonetheless real. “There are efficiencies in the process,” she said. “It’s not percentage-wise that there’s a savings, but there’s a cost savings in time, management, and responsibility.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T16:04:30+00:00August 22nd, 2014|0 Comments

URBAN HOME: "Brought Back To Life"

URBAN HOME: “Brought Back To Life”

The Chiles residence in Raleigh.

The Chiles residence in Raleigh.By Anne Marie Ashley
August/September 2014 — Abandoned in the 1960s, this old steel-framed and woodpaneled home on a hilltop overlooking Crabtree Creek seemed unredeemable to everyone but the Chiles’. Through the kudzu covered walls and rotted, ivy-ridden wood they could see a pristine, modern home that would pay proper homage to the Mid-Century Modern structure it once was. It reminded them of Pierre Koenig’s homes in the California hills, they would say. The bones of the home were strong and their vision clear, and the couple began a year-long journey to build a living gallery full of art, light and open spaces.

The Chiles’ called on Tonic Design in Raleigh to help them reconstruct the home, knowing their design/build model would be ideal for this type of project. “The clients came to us wanting the most loft-like home and home-like loft,” says Vincent Petrarca, lead designer at Tonic. “They felt we could help them realize their dream of a modern home.” Having visited other significant architectural projects like Falling Water done by Frank Lloyd Wright and Villa Savoye outside of Paris designed by Le Corbusier, the Chiles’ recognized the details that they were drawn to and could use these as a reference point when designing the new home. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:04:32+00:00August 6th, 2014|0 Comments

ARCHITECTS+ARTISANS: "Six Winners in Matsumoto Competition"

ARCHITECTS+ARTISANS: “Six Winners in Matsumoto Competition”

Three jury-selected modern homes and three “people’s choice” houses are the winners in the 2014 Matsumoto

The Smart-Stell house won First Place in the Jury Awards category. Photo by Todd Lanning.

The Smart-Stell house won First Place in the Jury Awards category. Photo by Todd Lanning.

Prize competition in North Carolina.
The six homes – from Durham, Leicester, Asheville, Wilmington, Raleigh, and Charlotte – made the final cut out of 12 total entries.
The competition, the third in as many years, is sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses. Its intent is to honor architect George Matsumoto, who once taught and built in the mid-century modern aesthetic in Raleigh. Recruited by Henry Kamphoefner to teach at N.C. State’s School of Design, Matsumoto practiced in North Carolina from 1948 to 1961.

“We want to encourage architects to continue the modernist movement,” says George Smart, executive director of the non-profit organization. “There are cash prizes of $3,000 for first place, $2,000 for second, and $1,000 for third. Designing houses is not a big moneymaker; it’s a labor of love, and this helps keep the architects going.” READ MORE…

2018-11-05T16:10:03+00:00July 25th, 2014|0 Comments

Tonic Takes Home A "Hat Trick" and Top Honors from the 2014 Matsumoto Prize

For a seemingly simple house that accomplishes many tasks.

Interior/exterior of the Smart-Stell house. Photo by Todd Lanning.

Interior/exterior of the Smart-Stell house. Photo by Todd Lanning.

In hockey it’s called a hat trick, in horse racing a trifecta, and in bowling a turkey.
For Tonic Design + Tonic Construction of Raleigh, NC, it’s the third time in a row that their work has received top honors in the annual Matsumoto Prize for Modernist residential design across the state, sponsored by the non-profit organization North Carolina Modernist Houses.
On Thursday night, July 17, Tonic’s partners Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, received First Place in the Jury Awards category for the Smart-Stell House, a 2400-square-foot, single-story house they designed and built on a lakefront property in Durham, NC. The award came with a check for $3000.

This was Tonic’s second consecutive First Place prize. Last year, the firm’s Rank Residence in Pittsboro received First Place in the Jury Awards category. In 2013, a house they designed and built in Greenville, the Walters Residence, received Third Place in NCMH’s awards program, which is named for George Matsumoto, FAIA, a Modernist master and a founding faculty member of the NC State University School of Design.
Owned by George Smart and Eleanor Stell, this year’s award-winning house overlooks a lake on one side and a non-descript neighborhood on the other. Tonic’s main challenge was to maximize the view of the lake while still providing a comfortable living space inside. The solution was extensive glazing on the side facing the lake and a hockey stick-shaped roof structure fabricated of wood beams and steel plate. This composite structure, designed with the help of the North Carolina Solar Center, supports an Ipe trellis. The size and spacing of the trellis’ slats ensure that direct sunlight is blocked during the summer but allowed to enter and warm the main living volume in the winter.

Jury organizer Frank Harmon, FAIA, presented the award to Petrarca and Hogan and shared comments from the professional jury, which included accomplished architects from New York, Massachusetts, and California:

“This is a seemingly simple plan…that accomplishes many complex tasks…They liked the quiet, private side of the house facing the neighborhood and the open, informal side of the house facing the lake. They admired the deep [roof] overhang facing the sun and views, and the clerestory that brings light from the street side into the living room while maintaining privacy. Here is a building that responds to the phenomena of the site. And in its openness, simplicity, use of materials, textures, structure, and solar aspects, it is exemplary of the best aspects of mid-century Modernism.”

“Needless to say, we’re honored and thrilled to receive a Matsumoto Prize again this year,” said Petrarca. “We would like to thank North Carolina Modernist Houses for continuing to sponsor an awards program that focuses so sharply on Modern homes in a state that’s dominated by traditional design.”

For more information on NCMH and the annual Matsumoto Prize, visit www.ncmodernist.org.
For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction and the Smart-Stell House, visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-07T03:04:58+00:00July 21st, 2014|0 Comments

Architect Katherine Hogan Wins 2014 Women In Business "Future Star" Award

Architect Katherine Hogan Wins 2014 Women In Business “Future Star” Award

Triangle Business Journal honors the president of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction.
Katherine Hogan, AIA (photo by John West)

Katherine Hogan, AIA (photo by John West)

Katherine Hogan, AIA, partner and principal of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh, has received a 2014 Women in Business Award from Triangle Business Journal (TBJ) in the “Future Star” category.
According to TBJ, the Women in Business Awards program recognizes Triangle women “who have proven to be dynamic and outstanding leaders with established track records of significant accomplishments in business and/or community service.”

Hogan, 32, is a licensed architect and a LEED-accredited professional. Last year, the national professional journal Residential Architect named Hogan and her partner/husband, Vincent Petrarca, 2013’s “Rising Stars” out of all young architects/architectural firms in the nation. Also in 2013, Green Building & Design, a national magazine focused on sustainable design and construction, singled Hogan out as an “Architect To Watch.”

Hogan joined the Raleigh design-build firm in 2008. Since then, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has completed over 50 projects and received 20 major design awards and other honors, including a national American Institute of Architects (AIA) Small Projects Award for the Lowe’s Pavilion in the North Carolina Museum of Art Sculpture Garden. Since Hogan joined the firm, Tonic has become nationally known for Modern, cost-effective, environmentally sustainable projects, especially residential and small-scale commercial projects.

Katherine Hogan is a regularly invited juror for undergraduate and graduate student design reviews at the NC State University College of Design. She has been a guest juror at her alma mater, the Syracuse University School of Architecture, where she also serves on the School’s Advisory Board.

Hogan has been an active member of the AIA Triangle Design Awards Committee for four years and, this year, is serving as vice chair of the committee. She is also a member of the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Contemporaries Board, and she actively participates in events sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to Modernist residential design.

Nearly 400 business leaders from across the Triangle gathered for lunch at the Raleigh Marriott City Center to honor this year’s Triangle Business Journal Women in Business Award winners. For more information on the awards program and the ceremony, click here.

For more information on Katherine Hogan and Tonic Design + Tonic Construction visit www.tonic-design.com.

2018-11-07T03:09:00+00:00April 16th, 2014|0 Comments

Modern House by Tonic Design in Raleigh is Modern Richmond’s April Tour

Modern House by Tonic Design in Raleigh is Modern Richmond’s April Tour

Cedeno, MR
The private Cedeno residence will be open for public touring on April 9th.

April 7, 2014 (Raleigh, NC) — The Alex Cedeno residence in Richmond, Virginia, by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, an award-winning design-build firm in Raleigh, NC, will be the featured property during Modern Richmond’s April Exchange Tour on April 9 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Modern Richmond Tours highlight examples of both residential and commercial properties in Richmond that employ Modernist techniques. Modern Richmond events are free and open to the public, but a $5 donation is appreciated.

Completed in 2011, the Cedeno home’s design integrates modern construction materials and sensibilities with high function. Key priorities were to ensure aesthetic integration with the surrounding terrain, to maximize views of the James River from the master bedroom and office, and to create an integrated, open space on the main floor and outdoor patio conducive for entertaining.

The house features a spacious finished basement that includes a wine cellar, an artist’s studio, a gym, and a large music/media room designed by Rives Audio, an acoustical engineering firm in Iowa. The second floor houses the master suite and two additional bedrooms and baths.
Sherman Associates PLC built the house in close collaboration with Tonic Construction.
Homeowner Alex Cedeno will speak during the tour at 6:15. Participants are free to tour the house before and after his brief talk.

The Cedeno house is located at 9151 James Riverwatch Drive, Richmond, VA 23235. For more information on the tour, go tomodernrichmondtour.com/news-events.
For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, go to www.tonic-design.com.

About Modern Richmond:
Modern Richmond is committed to the concept of understanding and appreciating modernism in all of its forms. The co-founders believe that Richmond has the resources and the potential to be a significant platform for modern projects. Their hope and mission is to promote and explore these original expressions of modern aesthetics in a way that both engages and delivers modernism to a larger audience. For more information: http://modernrichmondtour.com.

2018-11-07T03:09:42+00:00April 8th, 2014|0 Comments

INDEPENDENT WEEKLY: Vote! Best of the Triangle readers poll…

INDEPENDENT WEEKLY: Vote! Best of the Triangle readers poll…

Best-of-VOTE-for-US-728x90

Voting in The Independent’s 2014 Best In The Triangle readers poll has begun. The polls close at 11:59 pm on April 20.

Vote for your favorite businesses, people and more in six major categories: Wine & Dine, Out & About, Goods, Services, Odds & Ends and our Comments section.

Speaking of services…. we welcome your vote for Tonic Design + Tonic Construction for ARCHITECT! Click here to start voting…

2018-11-07T03:10:13+00:00March 25th, 2014|0 Comments

NCSU TECHNICIAN: "Professor awarded for sustainable home design"

NCSU TECHNICIAN: “Professor awarded for sustainable home design”

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture recently awarded adjunct N.C. State architecture professor Vincent Petrarca the Faculty Design Award, for his modern single-family home design.

Petrarca, a co-owner, designer and contractor of Tonic Design, was the mastermind behind the award-winning, environmentally-friendly house located in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Petrarca, an adjunct professor at the University, said N.C. State had a huge impact on his success as an architect.  READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:10:48+00:00February 28th, 2014|0 Comments

NCSU Adjunct Faculty Member Vincent Petrarca Receives ACSA Faculty Design Award

NCSU Adjunct Faculty Member Vincent Petrarca Receives ACSA Faculty Design Award

For a Modernist house designed and built by his firm Tonic Design +
Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

Vincent Petrarca

Tonic Construction

 

Vincent Petrarca, an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Architecture at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and a founding partner of the Raleigh, NC-based design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, has received a prestigious 2013-2014 Faculty Design Award from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) for his design of “Crabill Modern,” a Modernist, single-family house in Hillsborough, N.C.

 

Each year, the ACSA honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, and service. 

 

The ASCA’s Faculty Design Awards honor built work that “advances the reflective nature of practice and teaching by recognizing and encouraging outstanding work in architecture and related environmental design fields as a critical endeavor,” according to the ACSA. Winning professors “inspire and challenge students, contribute to the profession’s knowledge base, and extend their work beyond the borders of academy into practice and the public sector.”

 

Petrarca explained the evolution of Crabill Modern’s award-winning design:

 

“We began with the most efficient and economical plan form: a rectangle with plan functions divided into quadrants. We then challenged and re-envisioned the box based on the patterns of use and lifestyle of the family. These transformations created a plan where the more important spaces grew larger. These moves began to push and pull the building’s protective skin, creating dynamic elevations. The resulting form was a simple box, protected and augmented by an inexpensive but highly articulated shell.”

 

That shell reflects the rural setting: Petrarca specified simple, inexpensive materials and references to regional agricultural structures that would be rendered in a modern architecture composition. Recalling old farm sheds, the house’s skewed cubic form is clad in solid and perforated COR-TEN®, a steel alloy that eliminates the need for painting. The steel forms a stable rust-like appearance as it weathers. As a result, the house will be a constantly evolving element in the landscape as a rich patina develops over the years. The COR-TEN also acts as a rain screen, canopy, sunshade, and visual screen.

 

Petrarca included a variety of energy conservation principles in the Crabill home. Consequently, the owners report that, even though this house is 800 feet larger than their previous home, their energy bills average 30 percent less.

 

Tonic Construction completed the home for $155 per square foot due in large part, Petrarca says, to the design/build process and readily available materials, including oak.

 

Vincent Petrara will receive the Faculty Design Award during the ASCA’s 102nd Annual Meeting, to be held in Miami Beach April 10-12, hosted by Florida International University.

 

For more information on the ASCA and the Educational Awards Program, visit www.acsa-arch.org.

 

For more information on Vincent Petrarca and his firm, visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

2018-11-07T03:11:15+00:00February 17th, 2014|0 Comments

Tonic Partners To Be Featured Guests at "Appetite4Architecture" Dinner

Tonic Partners To Be Featured Guests at “Appetite4Architecture” Dinner

As top prize winner of the 2013 Matsumoto Prize for Modernist Residential

Raleigh NC architects

Katherine Hogan and Vincent Petrarca of Tonic Design | Tonic Construction.

Design

 

January 9, 2014 (Raleigh, NC) – Residential designers Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh will be featured guests at the 2014 “Appetite4Architecture” dinner to be held at 18 Seaboard Restaurant in Raleigh on Tuesday, January 14, beginning at 7 p.m.

 

Sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH), “Appetite4Architecture” (A4A) is a chance for the general public to meet and eat with some of the Triangle’s best Modernist residential designers in a casual, relaxed setting. This year’s only A4A event focuses on the winners of NCMH’s 2013 George Matsumoto Prize Recognizing Excellence in North Carolina Modernist Residential Design.

 

“This is a rare chance to enjoy easy, informal discussions in an upscale dining environment with prominent members of the Modernist architecture community,” noted NCMH founder and director George Smart.

 

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, a multi-award-winning, full-service, design-build firm headquartered in Raleigh, received the top prize from the professional jury in the 2013 competition for the design of the “Modern Gothic” Rank residence in Pittsboro, NC. The same project received third prize in the People’s Choice category, in which the general public could vote online.

 

Petrarca and Hogan were also named Residential Architect magazine’s 2013 Rising Star Leadership Award winners.

  

Seating is limited so anyone interested in attending the dinner should contact Smart immediately at 919-740-8407. For more information on A4A, go to www.ncmodernist.org/a4a.htm.

 

NCMH is an award-winning non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across North Carolina. For more information: www.ncmodernist.org.

 

For more information on Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

2018-11-07T03:11:42+00:00January 9th, 2014|0 Comments

DURHAM HERALD: "Rosenberg-Reeves Home Designed For How People Actually Live"

DURHAM HERALD: “Rosenberg-Reeves Home Designed For How People Actually Live”

By Kim Weiss
DURHAM — Modern houses allow us to live the way we actually live.  Alex Rosenberg, chairman of the g25825800000000000082d3ee645c5c07a9f6ad0dd62f3efa4f64efb01dPhilosophy Department at Duke University, and his wife, Martha Reeves, visiting professor of markets and management studies at Duke, were well aware of that concept when they hired the Raleigh-based design-build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction to create their one-story, 2,400-square-foot home in Durham.
Like many homeowners, Alex and Martha had come to realize that family and friends always congregated in the kitchen when they came for a visit or a dinner party. A Modern home’s open floor plan would allow them to combine kitchen, living room and dining room in one space with each element of the space flowing seamlessly into the other. And since the kitchen is the “heart” of most homes — especially for Martha, who loves to cook — they wanted their kitchen to be the physical center of their house. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:12:12+00:00December 19th, 2013|0 Comments

DESIGNBLOOM: "tonic design cubed volume for remote rank residence"

DESIGNBLOOM: “tonic design cubed volume for remote rank residence”

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

The Rank Residence

located on the edge of a forest and deeply rooted into the property, the ‘rank residence’ by american firm tonic design offers a high level of privacy within its vertical structure. designed for recording artist michael rank, the black and white house in north carolina is reminiscent of piano keys with narrow windows placed to suggest notes on the staffs of sheet music. the 3200-square-foot cubic volume consists of four levels, with a 1100-square-foot four-car garage beneath to hold the owner’s ‘muscle’ cars. the main living space is expressed on the exterior by painted concrete panels, while the upper two levels are clad in factory-finished, black standing-seam metal roofing material. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:13:05+00:00November 2nd, 2013|0 Comments

Residential Architect Magazine Names Raleigh Firm 2013’s "Rising Star"

Residential Architect Magazine Names Raleigh Firm 2013’s “Rising Star”

Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan receive one of the national journal’s VP, KH_sm.jpbannual Leadership Awards.

 

October 17, 2013 (Raleigh, NC) – Last weekend, Residential Architect Magazine presented home designers Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, partners in the Raleigh-based firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, with its 2013 Rising Star Leadership Award. The presentation took place during a luncheon held at the Wyndham Hotel in San Francisco, CA, as part of the annual Reinvention Symposium sponsored by Residential Architect’s publisher, Hanley Wood.

Since Tonic was founded in 2003, the design-build firm has completed a steady stream of private residences, many of which have received design awards from the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) South Atlantic Region, AIA North Carolina, AIA Triangle, and other design awards programs.

In 2006, Tonic’s dramatic rehabilitation/renovation of a mid-century house in Raleigh, the Chiles Residence, made the final list for World Architecture News’ “House of the Year.”

In 2005, a kitchen design-build project received a Merit Award from Custom Homes magazine.

In 2008, the Chiles Residence received a Custom Homes Merit Award. In 2009 the same project received one of Raleigh, NC’s Sir Walter Raleigh Appearance Commission awards.

In 2010, a house Tonic designed and built for a family in Greenville, NC, received AIA North Carolina’s Gail Lindsey Award for sustainability.

And this year, the “Modern Gothic” house Tonic designed and built in Pittsboro, NC, for a local recording artist received First Prize in the George Matsumoto Prize competition sponsored by NC Modernist Houses (www.ncmodernist.org).

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has also received high honors for non-residential work. The shelter structure the firm designed and built for the North Carolina’s Museum of Art’s Sculpture Garden, entitled “Art as Shelter,” has received five design awards, including the national AIA’s 2010 Small Project Award for “Architecture in the Public Interest.”

In the article on this year’s Rising Star Award, contributor Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson points out that “Petrarca, 41, and Hogan, 32, don’t bring a signature sensibility to their work. Each residence presents an entirely distinctive vision, which, it turns out, is the connective tissue of Tonic….What threads through every Tonic project is a reverence for material, a respect for the site and the budget, and what Hogan calls a ‘modern sensitivity.’”

Residential Architect has also published Tonic’s private residences on several occasions. And when the magazine launched a new video series that explores the importance of residential design and the value architects bring to the housing industry, the editors included an interview with Hogan and Petrarca.

Rising Star is one of three Leadership Awards the magazine presents each year along with its annual Design Awards. The Reinvention Symposium is the only high-level national conference devoted exclusively to the residential design professional. For more information on the magazine, go to www.residentialarchitect.com.

For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

2018-11-07T03:13:55+00:00October 18th, 2013|0 Comments

DWELL: "A Gothic Inspired Modern Home"

DWELL: “A Gothic Inspired Modern Home”

By Diana Buddsrank-residence-exterior-rectangle
Modernism’s crisp lines and ornament-free surfaces bear little resemblance to Gothic architecture’s gingerbread house–like flourishes. But in the North Carolina residence belonging to a musician and his son, Medieval structures informed the contemporary design. Michael Rank approached Raleigh-based firm Tonic to create a house that emphasized his love of tall, vertical spaces and staircases. A professional musician, Rank also requested space for a recording studio. Privacy was paramount as was room for his collection of art and muscle cars. Tonic took all the requirements and delivered a thoughtfully planned two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath house at about $200 per square foot. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:14:21+00:00October 16th, 2013|0 Comments

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT, 2013 LEADERSHIP AWARDS: "Rising Star: Tonic Design | Tonic Construction"

RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT, 2013 LEADERSHIP AWARDS: “Rising Star: Tonic Design | Tonic Construction”

Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan don’t have a singular style, but they do have a distinctive vision.

By Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson

Katherine Hogan and Vincent Petrarca of Tonic Design | Tonic Construction, in their Raleigh, N.C., studio. (Photo by Ian Allen)

Katherine Hogan and Vincent Petrarca of Tonic Design | Tonic Construction, in their Raleigh, N.C., studio.
(Photo by Ian Allen)

Look through the portfolio of houses designed and built by the Raleigh, N.C.–based Tonic Design | Tonic Construction. While the architecture is decidedly modern in inspiration, zeroing in on a singular style isn’t easy. In the Rank Residence, completed last year, a dramatic, Gothic-inspired four-story home uses slender windows and a dizzying stair design to play off vertical space. The Smart-Stell Residence, by contrast, is a quieter, one-story, horizontal home with vast expanses of glass. Each residence presents an entirely distinctive vision, which, it turns out, is the connective tissue of Tonic.
“Look at two of our houses and they couldn’t be more different,” says Vincent Petrarca, Assoc. AIA, who co-founded Tonic a decade ago and now runs the firm with his wife and partner, Katherine Hogan, Assoc. AIA. “We are good at figuring out what each project is about and not making it about us.”
This doesn’t mean, of course, that Petrarca, 41, and Hogan, 32, don’t bring a signature sensibility to their work. What threads through every Tonic project is a reverence for material, a respect for the site and the budget, and what Hogan calls a “modern sensitivity.”
“We try to be really good listeners with our clients,” Hogan says, “and we try to involve them while also providing good design and remaining sensitive to the context.” READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:14:53+00:00October 14th, 2013|0 Comments

CHEVROLET.com – DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY: "With its sleek design and modernist appeal, the 2014 Impala is your dream car. How about a home to match?"

CHEVROLET.com – DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY: “With its sleek design and modernist appeal, the 2014 Impala is your dream car. How about a home to match?”

By Greg BarberaChevrolet Logo

You love your 2014 Impala. You love its sleek, sculpted lines and the smooth ride it offers courtesy of its eye-pleasing aerodynamic design. You love the masterful craftsmanship that has resulted in your rewarding driving experience. So what’s the problem? You really want the right place to park it—specifically, a home that matches your design sensibility and your Impala’s striking appearance and head-turning profile. Here’s a quick tour of stylish, modernist residences that might fit the bill.

This may come as a surprise to some people, but the Triangle area of North Carolina—which includes Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill—has the third largest concentration of modernist homes in the country. Only Los Angeles and Chicago have more. These are not just homesteads; like your vehicle, they’re pieces of art. Raleigh’s Tonic Design recently built a house for local musician Michael Rank that turns the heads of passersby… READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:15:19+00:00October 7th, 2013|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "AIA Triangle tour of homes takes place Oct. 5"

 NEWS & OBSERVER: “AIA Triangle tour of homes takes place Oct. 5”

Home & Garden – Living

Five Triangle-area homes displaying outstanding design features will be open to the public Saturday during the American Institute of Architects annual tour. Pictured here: the Lanning house by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

Five Triangle-area homes displaying outstanding design features will be open to the public Saturday during the American Institute of Architects annual tour. Pictured here: the Lanning house by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

Five Triangle-area homes displaying outstanding design features will be open to the public Saturday during the American Institute of Architects annual tour.
Four of the homes were chosen by a jury of architects based on criteria such as overall design, quality, ability to meet client needs, harmony with the site, and other factors. The fifth home is a 1957 award-winning design by James Murray Webb, formerly a member of the UNC-Chapel Hill City and Regional Planning School.
The homes will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost for the tour is $15 online through noon Saturday; $20 at the open home locations in Cary, Raleigh and Chapel Hill.
The self-guided tour is sponsored by the 750-member Triangle Section of the American Institute of Architects.
For details and a tour map, visit aiatriangletour.com.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/10/04/3250228/aia-triangle-tour-of-homes-takes.html#storylink=cpy
2018-11-07T03:15:44+00:00October 5th, 2013|0 Comments

Houzz.com: "Explore The Art of Light and Dark In Design"

Houzz.com: “Explore The Art of Light and Dark In Design”

By Jen Dalley, Houzz Contributor and architect

2018-11-07T03:16:23+00:00September 7th, 2013|0 Comments

NEWS & OBSERVER: "NC Modernist Houses contest gives awards for outstanding new designs"

 Michael Rank's 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects and is the top winner in the George Matsumoto Prize competition. COURTESY OF RAYMOND GOODMAN


Michael Rank’s 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects and is the top winner in the George Matsumoto Prize competition.
COURTESY OF RAYMOND GOODMAN

 

If the term “modern architecture” brings to mind a stark style best suited to urban landscapes, you may do a double take when looking over this year’s George Matsumoto Prize winners.
The six new homes recently honored by the N.C. Modernist Houses contest range from a rustic mountain cabin to a coastal villa that sits lightly at the water’s edge as if poised to flit away. Yet what connects this diverse collection of homes are the staples of modernist architecture: functional form and a design that reflects each home’s location.
George Smart, founder of the nonprofit N.C. Modernist Houses (formerly known as Triangle Modernist Houses), says another common thread among the award winners was an emphasis on energy conservation.
“Sustainability and energy efficiency – those are very important qualities,” Smart said. “People want to have that option.” READ MORE…

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/08/16/3109769/nc-modernist-houses-contest-gives.html#storylink=cpy
2018-11-07T03:16:48+00:00August 19th, 2013|0 Comments

Tonic Design Takes Top Prize In Modernist Residential Design Competition

Tonic Design Takes Top Prize In Modernist Residential Design Competition

Raleigh design-build firm lands Jury’s and People’s Choice category

The Rank House received First Prize in the Jury Awards and Third Place in the People's Choice category. Photo courtesy of Raymond Goodman

The Rank House received First Prize in the Jury Awards and Third Place in the People’s Choice category. Photo
courtesy of Raymond Goodman

awards.

August 7, 2013 (Raleigh, NC) – The unusual “Modern Gothic” house designed and built by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction received the coveted First Prize in the professional Jury Awards category and Third Prize in the People’s Choice category during the second annual George Matsumoto Prize for modernist home design in North Carolina. The competition is sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses (formerly Triangle Modernist Houses).
The award-winning project is the new Rank Residence, the home of local music legend and recording artist Michael Rank and his young son. Featured recently in the Raleigh News & Observer, the flat-roofed, four-story, 3200-square-foot house satisfies the homeowner’s fascination with tall vertical spaces and staircases. The exterior is comprised of concrete and black standing-seam metal siding. Narrow vertical windows, placed within the metal seams, recall notes in sheet music, add to the house’s verticality while allowing for fast, affordable construction.
On the ground floor, a four-car garage provides room for Rank’s muscle cars and dragster. An eleven-foot-tall concrete entry staircase leads up to the home’s main level and triple-height main living space. Overhead, a network of black metal stairs and ramps lead to the rooms on the upper levels, including bedrooms, baths, a library, and a studio where the musician can write and record his music. As a design-build firm, Tonic served as both home designer and general contractor.

The jury liked stairs as the connecting factor between the house's volumes. Photo by Raymond Goodman

The jury liked stairs as the connecting factor between the house’s volumes. Photo by Raymond Goodman

“The jury liked the use of the stair as an ordering element because it formed the connective tissue of the design,” reported jury chairman Frank Harmon, FAIA, during the awards presentations held recently in the AIA NC Center for Architecture & Design in Raleigh. “They thought the interior spatial clarity was compelling. They admired the designers’ creative response to the program for a father-son dwelling, and for the homage paid to the client’s music.”

Tonic’s co-owners Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan received the $3000 cash prize for First Place in the Jury category, presented by North Carolina Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting modernist residential design in North Carolina.

For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction and the Rank Residence, visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

2018-11-07T03:17:06+00:00August 7th, 2013|0 Comments

ARQUITECTURA + ACERO: "Vivienda Unifamiliar – Smart-Stell House"

ARQUITECTURA + ACERO: “Vivienda Unifamiliar – Smart-Stell House”

(NOTE: Arquitectura + Acero is published in Chile so the article is in Spanish)
Esta casa se instala en un barrio bastante convencional al que no quiere ofender con su propuesta 352x246-images-stories-proyectos-SMARTsTELLhOUSE-Smart_3_Rear_Exterior_Daysimple pero claramente diferenciada de las construcciones vecinas. Para ello recurre a dos operaciones básicas: alejarse y cerrarse hacia la calle y abrirse al lago y el paisaje. La orientación sur oriente (recordar que la casa está en el hemisferio norte), las pendientes naturales del terreno y las vistas sobre el lago son favorables a esta decisión. Esta orientación también favorece la estrategia de eficiencia energética que es condición incorporada en el diseño. Una terraza con amplias celosías de madera controla las ganancias solares en verano y asegura un eficiente asoleamiento en invierno del volumen que alberga los recintos principales. READ MORE…

2018-11-07T03:17:36+00:00July 17th, 2013|0 Comments

TRIANGLE BUSINESS JOURNAL: "Vinny Petrarca | People"

TRIANGLE BUSINESS JOURNAL: “Vinny Petrarca | People”

  • Vinny Petrarca, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

    Vinny Petrarca, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction. © Allen Weiss

    Date added:  May 31, 2013

  • Submission Type:  Professional Recognition
  • Current employer:  Tonic Design + Tonic Construction
  • Current title/position:  principal
  • Reason for being recognized:  Award-winning designer Vinny Petrarca has been selected to serve as a juror for the 2013 Builder’s Choice and Custom Home Design Awards, a national competition… VIEW POST
  • 2018-11-07T03:21:53+00:00June 3rd, 2013|0 Comments

    Raleigh Designer Vinny Petrarca To Serve On National Awards Jury

    Raleigh Designer Vinny Petrarca To Serve On National Awards Jury

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction principal will help select the 2013

    Vinny Petrarca, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

    Vinny Petrarca, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

    Builder’s Choice and Custom Home Design awards winners.
    Award-winning designer Vinny Petrarca, a principal in the design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh, has been selected to serve as a juror for the 2013 Builder’s Choice and Custom Home Design Awards, a national competition sponsored by Custom Homes and Builder magazines, both Hanley Wood LLC publications.
    In her invitation to participate on the jury, Shelley Hutchins, senior editor for both Builder and Custom Home magazines, noted Petrarca’s “expertise in design and sustainability.”

    Petrarca and his firm have been recipients of Custom Home Design Awards twice: in 2005 for Tonic’s McCowan Kitchen project and in 2008 for the Chiles Residence.
    “It is such an honor to be invited to serve as a juror for this national competition,” Petrarca said. “I’m also looking forward to being able to see some of the finest work by some of the finest architects and designers across the country.”
    This year, the Hanley Wood awards program combines formerly separate programs – Custom Home Design Awards, Builder’s Choice awards, and the EcoHome awards — into one competition.
    According to Hutchins, the new program received 600 entries this year, so judging will take place over two days, June 17-18, in the Hanley Wood offices at One Thomas Circle in downtown Washington, D.C.

    The judging is blind and based on the architectural merit of the entries. The jury will make its selections independent of the Builder and Custom Home editorial staff, and will select Grand and Merit award winners in 27 categories of residential design and planning. The jury will also select a Best Project of the Year from among the Grand award-winning built entries.

    The winning entries will be featured in the Fall 2013 issue of Custom Home and the October 2013 issue of Builder. (To see the winners from last year’s Custom Home competition: http://www.customhomeonline.com/houses/award-winning/custom-home-design-awards.aspx.)

    Along with Petrarca, the 2013 jury will include: George Fritz of Horizon Builders; Steve James of DTJ Design; Rene Oehlerking of Garbett Homes; Michael Pyatok of  Pyatok Architects; and Teresa Rosano of Ibarra Rosano Design Architects.

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has received 26 design awards from 2005 to today. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2018-11-07T03:22:16+00:00May 31st, 2013|0 Comments

    CARY MAGAZINE: "Dream Homes"

    By Emily Uhland
    The Modern Getaway, Bahama, NC
    MAINBahama-Modern
    Spacious open interiors, lack of ornamentation, expansive windows and inventive architecture are all characteristics of Modernist homes, and all are represented in this custom home designed and built by Raleigh’s Tonic Design and Construction. “The space between the structures — we thought about that just as much as we thought about the actual building,” said designer Katherine Hogan. READ MORE & VIEW THE GALLERY…

     

    2013-05-29T17:51:04+00:00May 29th, 2013|2 Comments

    GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN: "Architect To Watch – Katherine Hogan"

    Interview by Erin Brereton

    partner in the design-build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction

    Katherine Hogan

    Katherine Hogan spent the first few years of her career at a nonprofit that provided design services to small, low-income rural communities. In 2008, she joined Raleigh, North Carolina-based Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, which recently received a Small Projects Practitioners award from the AIA for its pavilion at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Hogan, an associate AIA member and a LEED AP, is a partner at Tonic, alongside firm founder Vincent Petrarca. She spoke to gb&d about the benefits of being a builder and how she plans to keep pushing the industry forward.

    gb&d: How did your early work in your career help prepare you for your position at Tonic?

    Katherine Hogan: I worked for Will Bruder + Partners in Phoenix for a summer and got to go back full-time when I first graduated, which was a very wonderful experience. One of his descriptors of his work is that he always tries to find the extraordinary in the ordinary—to look at a material and try to use it differently and to examine space and context, which were all really good messages. I did a fellowship after that, where I worked in year increments on particular projects. A lot of the work was to further socially conscious design. I’ve done some really interesting projects and got to understand the client as not just someone who comes to you with a significant amount of money—the client is any person who needs a building.

    gb&d: You’ve been with Tonic Design since 2008. How did you come to specialize in residential and small-scale commercial projects? READ MORE…

     

     
     

    2013-05-08T03:18:07+00:00May 8th, 2013|0 Comments

    NEWS & OBSERVER: "In tune with gothic: Local rock musician's house sings with height & drama"

     Michael Rank's 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Photo courtesy of Raymond Goodman


    Michael Rank’s 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Photo
    courtesy of Raymond Goodman


     

    On the cover of his latest album, singer-songwriter Michael Rank walks down a dramatic concrete staircase that appears to lead endlessly upward behind him.
    But that staircase does end eventually – right at his front door.
    The stairs, the front door and even Rank himself are striking elements of a 3,200-square-foot modern gothic home that at once contrasts and complements the rolling, wooded land on which it is situated outside Pittsboro. The home recently received a Design Award from the Triangle chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), and it is expected to be part of a tour later this year hosted by the Triangle Modernist Houses group. READ MORE…
    2013-04-29T15:11:11+00:00April 29th, 2013|0 Comments

    ARCHITIZER: "GREENville House (Walters Residence)"

    A project by Tonic Design | Tonic Construction

    Walters Residence

    Walters Residence


     
    The “GREENville House”/Walters Residence is composed of two primary design components: bars and panels. Each acts together to generate an environmentally sensitive response. Narrow bars composed of private space branch out into the landscape to create courtyards, capture natural light, allow cross ventilation, and intersect to form a central volume of double height public space. Open to the kitchen and dining and a balcony and loft above, this central volume aligns with compelling views of the landscape. A structural system holding photovoltaic panels and perforated screens is responsible for creating the home’s energy and hot water while shading openings to alleviate unnecessary heat gain. The building’s orientation on the site utilizes the maximum potential of the photovoltaic technology, decreasing the overall load on the geothermal HVAC system. READ MORE & SEE THE GALLERY…

    2013-04-19T19:47:14+00:00April 19th, 2013|0 Comments

    ARQUITECTURA+ACERO: "Art as Shelter"

    (Note: Arquitectura is a Chilean architecture magazine. The content is in Spanish.)

    by F. PfennigerImage

    Ya el título del proyecto (Arte como Refugio) es sugerente. Se trata de un pabellón de uso diverso y múltiple (sala de clases, salón de observación y reflexión, objeto, escultura) dispuesto en un prado asociado al parque de esculturas del Museo de Arte de Carolina del Norte, específicamente en el programa de parques de arte o ‘arte en servicio’. Concebido como un espacio cubierto pero abierto (un refugio) el volumen indaga en tres cuestiones fundamentales: el repliegue y despliegue de los bordes y límites del espacio construido, la transparencia y permeabilidad de dichos bordes y el efecto del entorno sobre el volumen resultante, especialmente de la luz y del aire. Transparencias, sombras, reflejos, brillos se van alternando según las horas y las estaciones destacando la nervadura de la estructura que lo sostiene. READ MORE…

     

    2013-04-10T18:07:11+00:00April 10th, 2013|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Tonic Design's Energy-Efficient Smart-Stell Opens Up To The Outdoors In North Carolina"

    Smart-Stell-House-tonic-design-537x395By Ana Lisa Alperovich
    The Smart-Stell House is an energy-efficient North Carolina home made from standard off-the-shelf materials. Created by Tonic Design, the residence features a discreet facade that opens up in the back to a beautiful park, trees and a private lake.
    Smart-Stell House is a one-story horizontal house that likes to keep its privacy from the outside world featuring a band of clerestory windows on the top. Envisioned as a “home and vacation home” at the same time, it opens up to the back welcoming nature in.

    2013-02-24T18:27:29+00:00February 24th, 2013|0 Comments

    CARAGREEN: "Musician Soars, ECOfusion Floors"

    By Carrie Moorerank
    After winding down a long, pastoral, gravel road in Pittsboro, NC, we arrived at the soaring modern home of musician, Michael Rank. At four floors, it’s the tallest house ever created by Tonic Design, the architect and builder. Its black aluminum and gray cement exterior cut through the country landscape and sky. Ranks’ favorite “colors” – black, gray, and white – canvas the exterior and interior.
    Rank, who just released a new album, “In The Weeds”, with his band, Stag, also just completed construction on his new modern home, and used ECOfusion Color Fusion strand woven bamboo flooring from CaraGreen throughout. The ECOfusion bamboo flooring is a dark gray grounding color, called Morning Mist, with subtle flecks of blue and brown. The effect is created when ECOfusion uses its thru-color technology to dye the bamboo strands using pure plant-based pigments. READ MORE…

    2013-02-22T16:03:01+00:00February 22nd, 2013|0 Comments

    ARCH DAILY: "Smart-Stell Residence / Tonic Design + Tonic Construction"

    50ef1416b3fc4b53ef000027_smart-stell-residence-tonic-design-tonic-construction_smart_3_rear_exterior_day-528x369The clients wanted a new house but not a new neighborhood. On one of their daily walks they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The house, beyond repair, occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a small lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time, they said.
    The design of the new house addresses two key site relationships: (1) the existing neighborhood and its contextual scale, and (2) the landscape of the lake. From the street, the new one-story house’s form is low, quiet, and horizontal, with the only real opening towards the street at the main entrance porch. Because this house would be a dramatic departure from the typical houses in the neighborhood, we sitedit deeplyinto the property. READ MORE…

    2013-01-11T20:46:56+00:00January 11th, 2013|0 Comments

    METALMAG: "Metal Framing and Panels Provide nearly Transparent Shelter"

    By Krista Hovis

    Lowe's Park Pavilion at the NC Museum of Art

    Lowe’s Park Pavilion at the NC Museum of Art


    While many art museums have lawn sculptures to draw visitors in, the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh has taken the concept a step further. Within the museum’s 164-acre (66-hectare) park, the sculptures are more than just works of art; they serve functional purposes, as well. Designed by artists, the pieces are integrated into the infrastructure of the park and serve as seating, footbridges, gateways and, most recently, a shelter.
    As visitors to the park walk along the museum trail, they come upon a stand of trees and a structure in which to rest and look out on a prairie. The 750-square-foot (70-m2) Lowe’s Park Pavilion, made possible in part through a grant from the North Wilkesboro, N.C.-based Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation, is a work of art that provides shelter while blending with the surrounding landscape. Artist and exhibit developer Mike Cindric of Raleigh- based Design Dimension teamed up with Vincent Petrarca, a partner in the Raleigh- based architectural firm Tonic Design, to create an open and inclusive design process to achieve these goals. READ MORE…

    2013-01-08T21:02:24+00:00January 8th, 2013|0 Comments

    AEC CAFE: "Smart-Stell Residence in Durham, USA, by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction"

    a1171ab9By Sanjay Gangal
    The clients wanted a new house but not a new neighborhood. On one of their daily walks they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The house, beyond repair, occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a small lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time, they said.
    The design of the new house addresses two key site relationships: (1) the existing neighborhood and its contextual scale, and (2) the landscape of the lake. From the street, the new one-story house’s form is low, quiet, and horizontal, with the only real opening towards the street at the main entrance porch. Because this house would be a dramatic departure from the typical houses in the neighborhood, we sited it deeply into the property. READ MORE…

    2012-12-18T16:31:21+00:00December 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHITIZER: "Smart-Stell House"

    a1171ab9One of [Tonic Design’s] clients is the founder and director of Triangle Modernist Houses, an award-winning, non-profit organization that documents, preserves and promotes modernist residential design. Naturally, he and his wife wanted a modern house. But they didn’t want to leave their old neighborhood. Then, on one of their daily walks in the neighborhood, they found a 40-year-old structure for sale. The indistinct house was beyond repair, but it occupied a promising lot with a southeast exposure to a beautiful lake. This gave the couple the idea to build their “home and vacation home at the same time,” as they said. READ MORE

    2012-11-30T20:27:42+00:00November 30th, 2012|3 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Crabill House: A Modern & Energy Efficient Forest Shed in North Carolina"

    By Bridgette Meinhold

    The Crabill family bought a 5-acre forested lot in Hillsborough, NC and hired Tonic Design to build them a a simple, modern home that minimized its impact on the environment. They also had to stick to a budget and wanted a unique live/work space that inspired creativity. Tonic’s resulting design drew inspiration from regional agricultural structures and used simple and low maintenance materials to create a striking home that fit the needs of the family. Built for a modest $155 per sq ft, the Crabill House is energy efficient, avoids disturbing the natural environment, and maximizes natural lighting. READ MORE & SEE THE GALLERY…
    2012-11-26T15:03:07+00:00November 26th, 2012|1 Comment

    ARCHINECT: "Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Wins AIA NC's Only Residential Design Award"

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, an award-winning design/build firm in Raleigh, NC, has received a Merit Award from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) for its design and construction of the “Crabill Modern” house in Hillsborough, NC.
    It was the only residential project to win an AIA NC design award this year.
    This simple, modern home is located in a clearing amidst a lush, five-acre forest. The Crabills wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and to accommodate local wildlife. READ MORE…

    2012-11-21T23:22:12+00:00November 21st, 2012|0 Comments

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Wins AIA NC's Only Residential Design Award

    For a modern house in Hillsborough, North Carolina

    November 20, 2012 (Raleigh NC) – Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, an award-winning design/build firm in Raleigh, NC, has received a Merit Award from the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC) for its design and construction of the “Crabill Modern” house in Hillsborough, NC.
    It was the only residential project to win an AIA NC design award this year.
    This simple, modern home is located in a clearing amidst a lush, five-acre forest. The Crabills wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and to accommodate local wildlife.
    “They also wanted a unique live-work house that provides interesting spatial overlaps,” said project designer Katherine Hogan, who co-owns of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction with her husband, designer Vinny Petraca. “And they wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way.”
    The house is sited to avoid disturbing the environment, to maximize natural lighting and ventilation, and to frame views of forest, including a three-trunked tree.
    To reflect the rural setting, the design references regional agricultural structures yet renders them in a modern composition using simple, inexpensive materials. Recalling old farm sheds, the house’s skewed cubic form is clad in solid and perforated COR-TEN®, a steel alloy developed to eliminate the need for painting. The steel forms a stable rust-like appearance when exposed to the weather. As a result, the house will be a constantly evolving element in the landscape as a rich patina develops over the years. The COR-TEN also acts as a rain screen, canopy, sunshade, and visual screen.
    Spray foam insulation, tightly sealed ducts, low-e glazed windows, and Energy Star® appliances contribute to the home’s energy conservation. Despite the fact that their new house is 800 feet larger than their previous house, the Crabills report that their energy bills are, on average, 30 percent lower.
    The first floor includes the entry, a spacious kitchen/living/dining room, a studio/music space, and two decks. The second floor includes the master bedroom suite and two bedrooms for the Crabills’ children, who share an extra loft space and bath.
    Tonic Construction completed the house for $155 per square foot, due in large part to the design/build process and the creative use of materials.
    The annual AIA NC Design Awards celebrate the achievements of architects and designers across the state and recognize a select group of diverse projects that distinguish themselves both in response to their clients’ needs and design excellence. For more information, visit www.ncaia.org.
    For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, go to www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-11-20T21:25:22+00:00November 20th, 2012|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Chiles Residence: From an Abandoned House to a Light-filled Home for Art Collectors"

    By , 10/31/12
    Renovating an old steel framed house that was abandoned in the 1960s, architects at Tonic Design + Construction have managed to use the bones of the old place to create a beautiful residence for a couple of art collectors. Insisting on keeping the original concept of the house, John and Molly Chiles recognized the potential of the space, seeing open perches and quiet retreats nestled into its steel frame.

    The Chiles Residence is set in a hilly landscape of Raleigh, North Carolina. Overlooking Crabtree Creek, with rotted woodwork and decaying façade, the remains of the old house were transformed into a home that celebrates mid-20th century modern design. READ MORE

    2012-11-01T19:42:34+00:00November 1st, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHDAILY: "Crabill/Tonic Design"

    The Crabills bought the five-acre property near Hillsborough, NC, with the intention of building a simple, modern home in a clearing amidst a lush forest. They wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and accommodate local wildlife.
    “Our clients asked us to design a unique live/work house that inspire creativity and provides interesting spatial overlaps,” said project architect Katherine Hogan, co-owner of Tonic Design and Tonic Construction. “They also wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way”. The architects sited the house carefully to avoid disturbing the natural environment, to maximize natural lighting, and to frame views of forest, including a favorite three-trunked tree. READ MORE

    2012-10-31T17:36:39+00:00October 31st, 2012|0 Comments

    DESIGNBLOOM: "tonic design: crabill modern residence"

     
    american firm tonic design has finished the ‘crabill modern,’ a residence in the middle of a clearing in the surrounding five-acre lush forest property near hillsborough, north carolina. the family wanted a dwelling sensitive to the natural ecosystem, that encouraged creativity and provided a comfortable and interesting space to live. taking cues from the barn shed typology, the contemporary reinterpretation skews the floor plan, with perforated and solid corten panels fulfill the purpose of shading, screening and protecting from the natural elements without the need for further maintenance. READ MORE

    2012-10-25T17:35:12+00:00October 25th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHFLIP: "North Carolina Museum of Art: Sculpture Park Pavilion"

    RALEIGH, UNITED STATES – The addition to the North Carolina Museum of Art’s sculpture park is conceptualized as an outdoor classroom where visitors of the park can appreciate and reflect on their experiences of their museum and museum park visit.
    As an open structure the pavilion is as much a sculpture, as it is a building. It was designed specifically for the location it has been built on and adds a new element of architectural design to the park’s impressive collection of sculptures. Viewed as a building, the pavilion has an accessible area of almost 84sqm (900 square feet). READ MORE

    2012-10-23T16:43:52+00:00October 23rd, 2012|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Rustic GREENville House In North Carolina is Powered by both Solar and Geothermal Energy"

    by , 10/19/12
    Tonic Design has been on the green beat from the start with their contemporary, environmentally friendly home designs. This is particularly true of the GREENville residence located in the North Carolina city with the same name. The home’s striking program is defined by bars and panels, and it is powered by both solar and geothermal energy. It also features a slew of passive design techniques that further reduce its carbon footprint. READ MORE

    2012-10-22T17:31:00+00:00October 22nd, 2012|0 Comments

    CONTEMPORIST: "Chiles Residence by Tonic Design + Construction"

    Tonic Design + Construction provided a contemporary re-design for a mid-century modern house in Raleigh, North Carolina, that was in terrible condition after being abandoned in the 1960s.
    The modern 3500-square-foot house was designed and built for art collectors John and Molly Chiles. It was constructed on the bones of an old modern, steel-framed and wood-paneled house overlooking Crabtree Creek in Raleigh, NC, that was abandoned in the 1960s.The original house was in terrible shape: Its wood walls and floors, camouflaged by kudzu and ivy, had rotted. Yet the “bones” were still strong in concept, and the couple saw through the clutter. They were confidant that the neglected remains could form the basis for a dramatic new house that would pay homage to mid-20th century modern design. READ MORE…

    2012-10-18T22:45:32+00:00October 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCH DAILY: "GREENville House / Tonic Design"

    October 18, 2012
    Architects: Tonic Design
    Location: , North Carolina, United States
    Architect In Charge: Vinny Petrarca
    Photographs: Todd Lanning
    The “GREENville House”/Walters Residence is composed of two primary design components: bars and panels. Each acts together to generate an environmentally sensitive response. Narrow bars composed of private space branch out into the landscape to create courtyards, capture natural light, allow cross ventilation, and intersect to form a central volume of double height public space. READ MORE…

    2012-10-18T13:34:28+00:00October 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Sponsors NCMA's Art Purchase Party

     

    Tonic co-owners Katherine Hogan and Vinny Petrarca


    Continuing the design/build firm’s involvement with North Carolina’s art museum.
    October 11, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) — Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, a design/build firm in Raleigh, is sponsoring the North Carolina Museum of Art’s (NCMA) “Art Purchase Party,” an event that allows the NCMA Contemporaries to select a work of art that the Museum will purchase. The Party will be held on Saturday, October 13.
    Tonic is co-owned by Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan. Hogan is a member of the NCMA Contemporaries’ board of directors. The Contemporaries group is composed of young Triangle-area professionals who promote the Museum and help increase membership by sponsoring social and educational fundraising events.
    The NCMA Contemporaries worked with an NCMA curator to narrow down a list of nine artists and 27 different works of art to two finalists: Chris Jordan and Hank Willis Thomas. Both are young photographers who, according to the Museum, “highlight areas of the public consciousness in very different ways.
    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has also been involved with the NCMA in another way: The firm designed and built the Museum’s award-winning Sculpture Park Pavilion, which the partners call “Art as Shelter.”
    The Art Purchase Party is open to the general public, but only NCMA Contemporaries members can vote. For more information on the NCMZ Contemporaries and the Purchase Party, visit contemporaries.org.
    For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-10-11T20:56:13+00:00October 11th, 2012|0 Comments

    INHABITAT.com: "Lowe's Pavilion is Transparent Metallic-Skinned Art Shelter at North Carolina's Museum of Art"

    10/3/12
    By Bridgette Meinhold
    Lowe’s Pavilion is both a sculpture and a work of architecture that serves as an outdoor classroom at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Located on the edge of the property at the end of a wooden boardwalk, the ‘art as shelter’ pavilion sits within an open field and takes in the landscape while also working to blend in with it. The project was designed and built by Raleigh-based Tonic Design, who clad the recycled steel structure in a metallic “skin” that lets light and air pass through. READ MORE…

    2012-10-04T14:36:36+00:00October 4th, 2012|0 Comments

    ARCHDAILY.com: "North Carolina Museum of Art Sculpture Park Pavilion / Tonic Design"

    October 1, 2012

    © Jim West


    The pavilion is an outdoor classroom and component of the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Sculpture Park. The structure is wrapped in varying widths of horizontal, perforated metal bands, which offer experiences that change with the seasons, the light, and the vantage point of the viewer The pavilion’s metallic “skin” reflects its natural surroundings by taking on the colors of the grass and sky or, at times, completely disappearing into a moire pattern of light and shadow.
    The team selected metal, both steel and aluminum, for three primary reasons. Structurally, steel allows the building to resist lateral forces through the use of moment connections, thus avoiding cross bracing and keeping the interior space as visually open as possible, Secondly, the perforated metallic skin, reflective, opaque and transparent, allows breezes to flow through the space while creating a composition of changing light and shadow. Finally, metal is a recycled content material and could one day be recycled and reused. READ MORE…

    2012-10-02T17:34:57+00:00October 2nd, 2012|0 Comments

    AEC CAFE: "Tonic Design's House on Tour, Principals on Panel Discussion"

    September 19, 2012

    Photo by Todd Lanning


    An award-winning modern house designed and built by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction of Raleigh will be featured on the 2012 AIA Triangle Residential Architecture Tour on October 6, and Tonic principals Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan will participate in an associated panel discussion in Chapel Hill on September 25.
    Tonic’s Crabill Modern house (right) is one of only six residences selected for the Triangle Tour of Residential Architecture, featuring award-winning, architect-designed homes throughout the Triangle.  Each residence received an AIA Triangle honor award for design excellence. An independent jury, chaired by Roberto De Leon of the Louisville-based firm De Leon and Primmer Architecture Workshop, selected the six houses from all others submitted for inclusion. READ MORE…

    2012-09-20T14:26:50+00:00September 20th, 2012|0 Comments

    Tonic Design House on Tour, Principals on Panel Discussion

    AIA Triangle Residential Architecture Tour, Panel Discussion in Chapel Hill

    Crabill Modern. Photo by Todd Lanning, Gravitation Studios


    September 19, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) – An award-winning modern house,designed and built by the design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction of Raleigh, will be featured on the 2012 AIA Triangle Residential Architecture Tour on October 6, and Tonic principals Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan will participate in an associated panel discussion in Chapel Hill on September 25.
    Tonic’s Crabill Modern house is one of only six residences selected for the Triangle Tour of Residential Architecture, featuring award-winning homes throughout the Triangle.  Each residence received an AIA Triangle honor award for design excellence. An independent jury, chaired by Roberto De Leon of the Louisville-based firm De Leon and Primmer Architecture Workshop, selected the six houses from all others submitted for inclusion.
    Crabill Modern is a simple, modern home on a wooded, five-acre property in Hillsborough, NC. It was designed to be a “unique live/work house that inspire creativity and provides interesting spatial overlaps,” said Vinny Petrarca. “Our clients also wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way.”
    To reflect the rural setting, Petrarca specified simple, inexpensive materials and references to regional agricultural structures rendered in a modern architecture composition. Recalling old farm sheds, the house’s skewed cubic form is clad in solid and perforated COR-TEN®, a steel alloy developed to eliminate the need for painting. The steel forms a stable rust-like appearance when exposed to the weather.

    Katherine Hogan, Vinny Petrarca


    Before the tour, on Tuesday, September 25, Petraca and Hogan will participate in an AIA Triangle-sponsored panel discussion about the houses on the tour. Moderated by Anna Wu, FAIA, the discussion will be held from 7-8:30 p.m. in Flyleaf Books in Chapel Hill (752 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard).
    To see all of the houses selected for the self-guided 2012 Triangle Residential Architecture Tour, and to purchase tickets, go to www.aiatriangletour.com.
    For more information on the Crabill House and on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-09-19T19:56:39+00:00September 19th, 2012|0 Comments

    HOMEDSGN.com: "Crabill Modern by Tonic Design"

    9/14/12
    Raleigh-based studio Tonic Design has completed the Crabill Modern project, a two story contemporary home located in Hillsborough, North Carolina, USA.
    The Crabills bought the five-acre property near Hillsborough, NC, with the intention of building a simple, modern home in a clearing amidst a lush forest. They wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible and accommodate local wildlife.
    “Our clients asked us to design a unique live/work house that inspires creativity and provide interesting spatial overlaps,” said project architect Katherine Hogan, co-owner of Tonic Design and Tonic Construction. “They also wanted it to be constructed in a simple and cost-effective way.” SEE THE GALLERY & READ MORE…

    2012-09-14T15:24:55+00:00September 14th, 2012|0 Comments

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction Receives Fifth Energy Star® Rating

    Raleigh design/build firm continues work on energy-efficient homes.
    September 13, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) – Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, an award-winning design/build firm in Raleigh, NC, recently received its fifth Energy Star® rating for the design and construction of the Bahama Modern House, a modern, energy-efficient home owned by John Monroe of Bahama, North Carolina.
    This is also the fourth Energy Star rating the combined architecture firm and construction company have received this year for residential designs.
    Energy Star is a government-backed program that helps businesses and individuals protect the environment through superior energy efficiency. To earn the Energy Star rating, a home or business must meet strict guidelines for energy efficiency set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Homes achieve this level of performance through a combination of energy–efficient improvements, including,

    • Effective insulation
    • High-performance windows
    • Tight construction and ducts
    • Efficient heating and cooling
    • Energy Star® lighting and appliances

    “We find the Energy Star rating and process to be of great benefit to our clients,” said project designer and Tonic co-owner Katherine Hogan. “It not only reduces their annual operating costs by up to 20 percent, it also helps to achieve a more consistent interior thermal comfort and increases the indoor air quality of their home. The smaller decisions and building practices along the way can have a big impact on final product.”
    Southern Energy Management has been the local Energy Star rater on all of Tonic’s residential designs.
    “After living in a two-story, 1914 farmhouse for 30 years, which originally had no insulation, no running water, no electricity, and only the six fireplaces for heat, I was well aware of the limitations of this vernacular housing,” said homeowner John Monroe. “Having a comfortable living environment with reduced consumptive energy usage was appealing. I’ve spent the summer in the new house and beside the absolute beauty of the modern design, knowing that the house remains cool even with its almost full wall of windows makes me feel that the extra efforts to insulate the house and use the geo-thermal system, among other efforts were well worth it.”
    Hogan describes the Bahama Modern House as a “new, modern residence that reads as a mid-century modern,” with its flat rooflines; open floor plan and mixed-use interior spaces; and extensive glazing to blur the line between indoors and outdoors and to maximize natural lighting, including clerestory windows that allow natural light to penetrate deeply into the interior.
    The project also includes extensive terraced landscaping, a swimming pool and decking, and a pool house.
    For more information on the Energy Star rating system, go to www.energystar.gov.
    For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-09-13T20:32:53+00:00September 13th, 2012|1 Comment

    Raleigh Designer Takes Students To Fallingwater

    Vinny Petrarca’s students begin the semester at Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterwork.
    August 31, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) — Raleigh designer and Professor In Practice Vinny Petrarca began his second year of teaching at North Carolina State University’s College of Design by taking his students to Pennsylvania to visit Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterwork, Fallingwater.
    Petrarca, co-owner and principal of the design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh, teamed up with fellow design professors Sara Queen and Jay Smith and the director of graduate programs, David Hill, to take 60 graduate and fifth-year students to visit Fallingwater. For some of the students, it was a return trip. For many, it was the first time they’d ever seen a Wright house.
    Wright, America’s most famous architect, designed Fallingwater for his clients, the Kaufmann family.  Built between 1936 and 1939, the house doesn’t appear to stand on solid ground, but instead stretches out over a 30-foot waterfall. It captured the nation’s imagination when it was featured on the cover of Time magazine in 1938. Today it is a National Historic Landmark.
    Along with seeing one of the finest examples of modern residential design in America, the students also studied a a parcel of land next to Fallingwater that is serving as the site for their semester-long project. They spent two days sketching and designing on site before returning to Raleigh.
    A modernist designer himself, Vinny Petrarca is teaching the “ARC 500/50l Professional Studio,” the final studio for a Bachelor of Architecture degree. He describes it as “a comprehensive and integrative design experience — a transformational studio that exists between the foundation studios and forthcoming options and thesis-level studios.”
    Since the ultimate goal of architecture is the complete building, with all its complexity and components, Petrarca’s studio project helps students understand, then demonstrate, their ability to address the full range of constraints, conditions, and issues typically encountered in an architectural project.
    “ARC 500/501 simulates design processes that exist within professional offices, and asks students to integrate and elaborate on lessons from prior studios,” Petrarca said.
    For more information on Vinny Petrara, visit www.tonic-design.com.
    For more information on Fallingwater, go to www.fallingwater.org.

    2012-08-31T16:03:47+00:00August 31st, 2012|0 Comments

    WORLD ARCHITECTURE NEWS: "Walters' House lands jury award"

    A house designed by architect Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh received one of only three coveted Jury Awards during the inaugural George Matsumoto Prize for modernist residential design, sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses.
    Tonic’s “GREENville House,” the firm’s name for the home of Bobby and Kristi Walters of Greenville, NC, placed third in the competition, which was open to architects anywhere in the world as long as the house submitted was located in North Carolina. An Energy Star house, the Walters’ home was the first modern residence in the state to achieve LEED Silver accreditation. READ MORE…
     

    2012-08-18T14:32:51+00:00August 18th, 2012|0 Comments

    AEC CAFE.com: "Tonic Design Wins Matsumoto Prize for Modernist Residential Architecture"

    August 15, 2012
    A house designed by architect Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh received one of only three coveted Jury Awards during the inaugural George Matsumoto Prize for modernist residential design, sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses.
    Tonic’s “GREENville House,” the firm’s name for the home of Bobby and Kristi Walters of Greenville, NC, placed third in the competition, which was open to architects anywhere in the world as long as the house submitted was located in North Carolina. READ MORE…

    2012-08-16T18:45:25+00:00August 16th, 2012|0 Comments

    Tonic Wins Matsumoto Prize for Modernist Residential Design

    Raleigh design/build firm lands one of only three jury awards.
    August 15, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) – A house designed by Vinny Petrarca of the design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh received one of only three coveted Jury Awards during the inaugural George Matsumoto Prize for modernist residential design, sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses.
    Tonic’s “GREENville House,” the firm’s name for the home of Bobby and Kristi Walters of Greenville, NC, placed third in the competition, which was open to architects anywhere in the world as long as the house submitted was located in North Carolina.
    The 4100-square-foot residence is composed of two primary design components — bars and panels — that act together in an environmentally sensitive structure. Narrow bars composed of private spaces branch out into the landscape to form courtyards, capture natural light, and maximize cross ventilation. The bars intersect to frame a central volume of double-height public space.
    The central volume, open to the kitchen and dining space on the first floor and a balcony and loft above, aligns with views of the landscape.
    The house’s structural system holds photovoltaic panels that provide the home’s energy and hot water. Perforated screens shading the opening to alleviate unnecessary heat gain. The house’s orientation on the site utilizes the maximum potential of the photovoltaic technology, decreasing the overall load on the geothermal HVAC system. A drip-irrigation system outside captures rainwater and stores it in an underground cistern. Materials include steel, masonry, glass, concrete, Western Red Cedar, and zinc siding.
    An Energy Star house, the Walters’ home was the first modern residence in the state to achieve LEED Silver accreditation.
    The jury, comprised solely of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects, called the Walters’ house “a large and ambitious house with many materials and details. Well proportioned and vigorous, the house displays an uncommon passion for architecture. The materials and forms are stitched together like a beautiful quilt.”
    The jury also applauded Tonic for the firm’s “courage and energy to both design and build this remarkable house.”
    The other two Jury Award winners were John Reese, AIA, of Weinstein Freidlein Architects for the Banbury House in Raleigh, and Mike Rantilla, AIA, for his own home on Pictou Road, also in Raleigh.
    The jurors for the inaugural Matsumoto Prize were: Frank Harmon, chairman; George Matsumoto (for whom the Prize was named), honorary chair; Marlon Blackwell; Larry Scarpa; David Jameson; and Tom Kundig. Public vote via an online voting site served as one seventh of the total.
    Patrarca, a Professor of Practice at NC State University’s College of Design and co-owner Tonic Design + Tonic Construction with designer Katherine Hogan, received a $1000 cash prize and a glass trophy, both presented by Triangle Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving and promoting modernist residential design from the 1950s to today.
    For more information on the George Matsumoto Prize, go to www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/prize.
    For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-08-15T19:39:00+00:00August 15th, 2012|0 Comments

    Modern Home, Natural Habitat: Hillsborough Couple's Property Receives National Certification

    August 7, 2012 (Hillsborough, NC) — The National Wildlife Federation recently certified the John and Stacy Crabill property in Hillsborough, NC, as a natural habitat.
    The Crabills bought the five-acre property in 2010 with the intention of building a simple, modern home in a clearing amidst a lush forest. They wanted the house to disturb the natural environment as little as possible.
    To reflect the verdant surroundings, Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, a design/build firm in Raleigh, used simple, inexpensive materials and references to agricultural structures in a modern architecture composition. Recalling old farm sheds, the weathered COR-TEN® steel exterior, both solid and perforated, is “a constantly evolving element in the landscape,” said Tonic designer and co-owner Vinny Petrarca.
    COR-TEN is a group of steel alloys developed to eliminate the need for painting.  The steel forms a stable rust-like appearance if exposed to the weather for several years.
    “This is a house for a creative and passionate family to live and work in,” Petrarca noted. “It’s a house for a family that values design and that wanted something special.”
    The Crabills also made it a priority to accommodate the natural wildlife.
    “Our forest is special because of all the unique animals and plants that, together, make up a habitat,” wrote the Crabill’s young daughter, Madison, in her application for the natural habitat designation. “Since living here, we have seen animals and other wildlife that we have never seen before. We commonly see deer, lizards, frogs, raccoons, and other animals that all live on the same land that we call our home. We are always doing the best we can to create a habitat for the animals around us.”
    To become an officially certified wildlife habitat, the Crabills had to prove that their land provides food sources, water sources, cover (a thicket, rock pile, bird houses), and places where wildlife can raise young (such as dense shrubs, nesting boxes, etc.).
    “The wildlife in our forest occupy a different niche, and all together they make up a habitat in our forest,” Madison said. “The most important thing that I have learned from living here is that it is important to share land with the wildlife living all around us.”
    For more information on the Crabills’ home, visit www.tonic -design.com, click on “projects” then on “Crabill Modern.”
    For more information on the National Wildlife Federation and natural habitat certification, go to www.nwf.org.

    2012-08-07T15:49:59+00:00August 7th, 2012|0 Comments

    Raleigh Designer Joins Nationally Acclaimed Firm El Dorado

    Tonic Design + Tonic Construction’s Ted Arendes moves to Kansas

    Ted times two.


    City.

    July 17, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) – Tonic Design + Tonic Construction in Raleigh recently announced that designer/project manager Ted Arendes has joined the nationally acclaimed firm El Dorado in Kansas City, Missouri.
    Arendes is a graduate of the University of Kansas. He worked with Dan Rockhill at Studio 804 in Kansas before joining Tonic, a construction-led, design/build studio located in Raleigh.
    For five years, Arendes has worked on both the design and construction sides of the firm, both in the office and in the field. He has managed construction on many of the firm’s modernist houses, including the award-winning Smart-Stell residence in Durham; the Crabill residence in Hillsborough, which was featured in Dwell magazine in March of 2012, and the Rank residence currently under construction in Pittsboro.
    “It isn’t easy to find someone who is talented and highly skilled at both design and construction,” said Tonic co-owner Katherine Hogan. “Usually you have someone who is much stronger in one area. That’s why it has been great working with Ted. And we couldn’t be happier for him that he’s found a position in such a prestigious firm as El Dorado.”
    No doubt that dual expertise appealed to the El Dorado principles. As El Dorado partner Dan Maginntold Dwell in 2006, “The bottom line is that architects should know how to build. The best way to know how to build is to get in there and do it.”
    Tonic co-owner Vinny Petraca noted, “One of our first clients told me that, in any profession, you never know how much time you will spend with your colleagues. He told us, challenged us, to make each day count and to push each project to the highest limit because you never know how long, or short, that moment together will be. Ted has always been motivated to achieve success. I am so proud of our time with him. We definitely made our time together count.”
    El Dorado was founded in 1996. Its primary office in is Kansas City, MO, and the firm maintains a satellite office in Wichita, Kansas. For more information visit http://www.eldo.us.
    For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-07-17T22:39:12+00:00July 17th, 2012|0 Comments

    Tonic Enters Three Modernist Houses in Matsumoto Prize Competition

    (July 10, 2012) — Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, a design/build firm in Raleigh, has entered three house in the inaugural George Matsumoto Prize for modernist residential design in North Carolina built since 2006.
    This unique design competition is sponsored by Triangle Modernist Houses (TMH). One of the many things that make it unique is that the designers’ names aren’t concealed. (Most of the houses entered are already archived on Triangle Modernist Houses’ extensive online archive of residential designs throughout North Carolina.) Another is that the designers can be from anywhere but the houses entered must be in this state. The Matsumoto Prize also allows the public to cast its votes for favorite houses among those entered. A professional jury, chaired by Frank Harmon, FAIA, will also determine the winners with the public vote counting as an additional “judge.”
    Following are Tonic’s entered houses and links to the TMH pages on which the public may cast its vote (one vote per email address)…

    1. The John & Stacy Crabil House (be sure to watch the video!) http://www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/vote-6
    2. The GREENville House (Bobby & Kristi Walters’ residence) http://www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/vote-13
    3. Bahama Modern http://www.trianglemodernisthouses.com/vote-16

    The Prize is named for noted modernist architect George Matsumoto, who will serve as a honorary judge.
    Public voting closed Sunday, July 22, at 5 p.m. The winners will be announced during an Awards Reception on August 2, 7 p.m., in the new AIA NC Center for Architecture and Design in downtown Raleigh.

    2012-07-10T18:59:34+00:00July 10th, 2012|0 Comments

    Raleigh Designer Named To Syracuse Advisory Board

    Katherine Hogan


    Tonic Design’s Katherine Hogan joins the Syracuse University School of Architecture board.

    June 26, 2012 (Raleigh, NC) — Designer Katherine Hogan, a principal in the Raleigh design/build firm Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, has been appointed to the Advisory Board of the Syracuse University School of Architecture.
    “I’m honored to be a member of the board, which is composed of distinguished alumni and professionals,” Hogan said. “It is wonderful to remain connected to the school and to the future of the architecture program.”
    Originally from New York, Katherine Hogan completed her Bachelors of Architecture degree at Syracuse University in 2005 as a University Scholar, where she graduated summa cum laude with a minor in Italian language. She also attended the Syracuse Program of Architecture in Florence.
    After graduation, she worked with Will Bruder + Partners in Phoenix, Arizona, and held a fellowship position with Bryan Bell at Design Corps, a non-profit architecture practice serving communities normally without access to architectural services.
    Hogan joined Tonic design + Tonic Construction in 2008 and has since worked on multiple residential and small-scale commercial projects. She and the firm recently received a National AIA Small Projects Practitioners award for an educational pavilion at the North Carolina Museum of Art.
    An associate member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and a LEED Accredited Professional, Hogan frequently serves as a guest juror at several area schools and participates on many committees that promote design awareness. She is also a member of the North Carolina Museum of Arts Contemporaries Board and is entering her third year on the AIA Triangle Design Awards Committee.
    For more information on Katherine Hogan and Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit www.tonic-design.com.

    2012-06-26T23:55:00+00:00June 26th, 2012|0 Comments

    DESIGN & BUILD WITH METAL: "Architectural Zinc in Residential Applications: Why More Homes Will Include Zinc as a Duraable, Green Building Material"

    June 2012Image
    …In Greenville, North Carolina, the Walters Residence, a sleek, modern residence designed by Tonic Design + Build, is an excellent example of the use of architectural zinc in an eco-friendly, energy-saving home. Both the clients and the design team envisioned the house as a model of environmental sensitivity and materials selection was critical to their success. To that end, designer Vincent Petrarca, Associate AIA, specified 1500 square feet of VMZINC flat lock panel for the home’s double-height “public” space.
    “The color, material qualities, and the system of interlocking panels created a detailed texture of surface and shadow on the exterior facade of the two-story public space of the house,” said Petrarca. “In order to meet the goals of the a LEED for Homes Silver project, we selected zinc as a key feature in the exterior composition of materials. Not only is it 100 percent recyclable, but it’s also durable and low maintenance with a lifespan of nearly 100 years. This was very appealing to the clients.” READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

    2012-06-14T23:55:18+00:00June 14th, 2012|0 Comments

    RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT: "Value of Residential Architecture – Video Series"

    Screen shot from the video.


    Residential Architect magazine introduces a new video series that explores the importance of residential design and the value architects bring to the housing industry. Throughout the year, we’ll talk with residential architects passionate about their profession, among them Will Bruder, AIA, Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, Ted Flato, FAIA, Elizabeth Gray, FAIA, and Alan Organschi, Dan Shipley, FAIA, Vincent Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, Assoc. AIA, and John Carney, FAIA. Please join us for the entire series and find out how the spaces we occupy in our everyday lives shape us as human beings and as a society.
    CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE TONIC VIDEO

    2012-06-05T20:53:28+00:00June 5th, 2012|0 Comments

    INFORM: "Clearly _ Here: Raleigh, NC"

    Audio Buy redux


    The 2012 Inform Awards jury recognized this project by Tonic Design for its object design excellence.
    For the first 14 years of its life, what is now the Audio Buys Building stood as a symbol of the future in downtown Raleigh. The sleek Modern building, originally built in the mid-’60s, housed one of the most progressive drycleaners in the country. Displayed in the mostly glass façade was a collection of mechanized machinery designed to transport, clean, and press garments in North Carolina’s capital…READ MORE…

    2012-05-21T19:16:46+00:00May 21st, 2012|0 Comments

    DWELL: "Region of Honor"

    The Crabill House


    Tuned into its sylvan setting, this affordable green home in Hillsborough, North Carolina, is a modern take on the surrounding centuries-old structures.
    By Diana Budds
    Historic barns dot the countryside around Hillsborough, a region that traces its agricultural roots to the 1750s. So when John and Stacy Crabill contacted Tonic to design their new home, the firm gleaned inspiration from the local typology while taking things in a decidedly modern direction.
    “They really trusted us to do something different,” says Tonic’s architectural designer, Katherine Hogan. READ MORE…

    2012-03-12T19:07:27+00:00March 12th, 2012|0 Comments